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Near Wellsboro in Tioga County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Tiadaghton

The Town in the Canyon

— Pine Creek Rail Trail —

 
 
Tiadaghton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, August 28, 2013
1. Tiadaghton Marker
Inscription.  Exploding black powder charges boomed down this now peaceful canyon in the summer of 1891, as 90 Italian laborers shoveled, picked and blasted the new Fahnestock (say "funnystock") and Tiadaghton railroad into the steep canyon wall just across Pine Creek from here. Creon B. Farr, a local businessman, had purchased 3,000 acres of virgin hemlock near the rim of the canyon and needed a way to get it to the New York Central Railroad (now the rail trail) and on to Corning, NY for processing. His scheme included the construction of a dangerously steep switchback railroad grade up the canyon wall, as well as a 240-foot bridge over Pine Creek.

This side of the creek was equally industrious, as Wellsboro entrepreneur Leonard Harrison was building a sawmill to process the timber he owned. He sent his logs careening vertically down the canyon wall in narrow "slides," until they crashed into the creek below.

A small town named Tiadaghton rose around these short-lived operations. At its height of prosperity, it had two stores, a post office, a hotel, a one room school and over 20 homes.

Harrison's mill burned to the ground
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in 1906, and Farr left Tiadaghton behind when his timber resource was exhausted. Six families were still living here in 1936 when the post office closed and sealed the fate of the town.


 
Erected by Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1891.
 
Location. 41° 38.856′ N, 77° 27.008′ W. Marker is near Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, in Tioga County. Marker can be reached from Tiadaghton Hill Road, 2˝ miles west of West Branch Road (County Route 3007) when traveling west. Marker is mounted in a kiosk beside the Pine Creek Rail Trail at the Tiadaghton Campground. Marker is about 9 "rail trail" miles south of the U.S. Highway 6 & Pine Creek Road (Pennsylvania Route 362) intersection when traveling along the Pine Creek Rail Trail on bicycle or foot. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wellsboro PA 16901, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pine Creek (approx. 3.3 miles away); United States Civilian Conservation Corps (approx. 3.4 miles away); Born to Be Wild... and Respected (approx. 3.4 miles away); Is That an Eagle?
Marker detail: The Tiadaghton School image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: The Tiadaghton School
Pictured here are the children and teacher of the Tiadaghton School, exact date unknown. In the front row are: Leona Piccalo, Lewis Fave, Tony Piccalo, Joe Piccalo, Marietta Fave, Martin Fave, and Mary Fave. In the second row are Lee Acaro, Maude Delong, Jennie Fave, Rosie Piccalo, Lucy Arearo, unknown, Emma Parry, Voyle Masker, Nettie Piccalo, and Ben Fave. In the rear are Deloss Moscher and teacher Gladys Wilcox Callahan. The upper photo shows the schoolhouse.
(approx. 3.4 miles away); Planting for People (approx. 3.4 miles away); Pine Creek Gorge (approx. 3.4 miles away); Nessmuk (approx. 3.4 miles away); Civilian Conservation Corps (approx. 3.4 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Tiadaghton State Forest (Wikipedia). As the timber was exhausted and the land burned, many companies simply abandoned their holdings. Conservationists like Dr. Joseph Rothrock became concerned that the forests would not regrow if they were not managed properly. They called for the state to purchase land from the lumber companies and for a change in the philosophy of forest management. In 1895 Rothrock was appointed the first commissioner of the Pennsylvania Department of Forests and Waters, the forerunner of today's Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. (Submitted on March 11, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Marker detail: The village of Tiadaghton around 1900 image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: The village of Tiadaghton around 1900
Note schoolhouse in upper center. This is the only known photo of the town.
Marker detail: Creon Farr’s Switchback Railway image. Click for full size.
4. Marker detail: Creon Farr’s Switchback Railway
Creon Farr’s switchback railway, located across Pine Creek from here, was dangerously steep and narrow.
Marker detail: The “Tiadaghton” Locomotive image. Click for full size.
August 28, 2013
5. Marker detail: The “Tiadaghton” Locomotive
Built by Schenectady Locomotive Works in 1892, the “Tiadaghton” was a common sight in the canyon.
Marker detail: Leonard Harrison image. Click for full size.
6. Marker detail: Leonard Harrison
Having built his fortune at Tiadaghton, Leonard Harrison donated 137 acres to the Commonwealth. The land would later become Leonard Harrison State Park.
Tiadaghton Marker image. Click for full size.
7. Tiadaghton Marker
Marker and kiosk visible beside Pine Creek Rail Trail on left.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 11, 2020. It was originally submitted on March 11, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 719 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on March 11, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Apr. 22, 2024