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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Astor Library

"Heritage of New York"

 
 
Astor Library Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Andrew Ruppenstein, May 30, 2017
1. Astor Library Marker
Inscription.  This Italianate structure, begun in 1849 and completed in 1881 was built by John Jacob Astor, whose sons later added the north and center sections. Three architects contributed to its design: Alexander Saeltzer (South Wing, 1849-1853); Griffith Thomas (Center Section, 1856-1859); and Thomas Stent (North Wing, 1879-1881). Originally the City's first major library broadly accessible to the public, the Astor collection was combined with the Tilden Trust and Lenox Library in 1912 to form the nucleus of the New York Public Library.

Plaque erected 1967 by
The New York Community Trust

 
Erected 1967 by The New York Community Trust.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicEducation. A significant historical year for this entry is 1849.
 
Location. 40° 43.742′ N, 73° 59.509′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is on Lafayette Street north of East 4th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 425 Lafayette Street, New York NY 10003, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
Astor Library Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Andrew Ruppenstein, May 30, 2017
2. Astor Library Marker - Wide View
The marker is to the immediate left of the entrance, with a generic National Register of Historic Places plaque and the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society historical marker to its left.
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are within walking distance of this marker. Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (a few steps from this marker); Colonnade Row (within shouting distance of this marker); A Tower Of Music (within shouting distance of this marker); Paresis Hall (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Peter Cooper Park (about 400 feet away); Astor Place Riot! (about 400 feet away); The Cooper Union (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Cooper Union (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Regarding Astor Library. The building is listed in the "AIA (American Institute of Architects) Guide to New York City, Fifth Edition".
 
Also see . . .
1. Astor Library (Wikipedia). (Submitted on July 14, 2017.)
2. The Old Astor Library, Now the Joseph Papp Public Theater (New York Times, Feb. 10, 2002). (Submitted on July 14, 2017.)
3. The 1854 Astor Library. "Daytonian in Manhattan" entry. (Submitted on March 20, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Formerly the Astor Library, Now the Joseph Papp Public Theater image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Andrew Ruppenstein, May 30, 2017
3. Formerly the Astor Library, Now the Joseph Papp Public Theater
The NYPL abandoned the building in 1911, and the books were moved to the NYPL's newly constructed building by Bryant Park. In 1920, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society purchased it. By 1965 it was in disuse and faced demolition. The Public Theater (then the New York Shakespeare Festival) persuaded the city to purchase it for use as a theater. It was converted for theater use by Giorgio Cavaglieri. The building is a New York City Landmark, designated in 1965. - Wikipedia
<i>Interior view of the Astor Library, New York</i> image. Click for full size.
Wood engraving in Gleason's Pictorial, 1854, v. 6, p. 124, courtesy of the Library of Congress, 1854
4. Interior view of the Astor Library, New York
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 22, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 14, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 256 times since then and 35 times this year. Last updated on March 20, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 14, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 3, 2022