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Bentley Springs in Baltimore County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Bentley Springs

 
 
Bentley Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 5, 2007
1. Bentley Springs Marker
Inscription.  To look at Bentley Springs today it is difficult to imagine its past as a major destination from Baltimore along the Northern Central Railroad. This small village in upper Baltimore County is located just 4 miles below the Mason-Dixon line and 31 miles north of Baltimore City. The hillsides around this picturesque valley are dotted with springs “of the purest water.” In 1837, the Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad obtained a right of way through the valley.

Charles Bentley and his wife Anna purchased land in 1858 from the estate of James Calder and named it Bentley's Springs. Five different types of water “of great medicinal value” were found in the springs. In the 1930s, water from the springs was bottled here and shipped by rail to Washington and Philadelphia for use in office building coolers. Charles Bentley was an iron manufacturer in Baltimore who established the Baltimore Steam Boiler Works.

Apparently the Bentleys had no monetary concerns as they were able to launch a substantial building program. First a railroad station, a one story fieldstone building, was erected. Opposite the station, they
Marker detail: Locomotive arriving at Bentley Springs, Northern Central railway, late 19th century image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Locomotive arriving at Bentley Springs, Northern Central railway, late 19th century
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built a mansion for themselves named “Sunnyside”. Next a beautiful hotel containing 40 rooms with lavish appointments and a marble courtyard named "Glenn House" was built. Bentley Springs soon became a popular summer resort with hundreds of visitors each summer arriving by train.

Unfortunately the hotel burned on Nov. 7, 1868. Mr. Bentley then leased a site on the other side of the railroad to a company which built a 22 room mansion called "The Boarding House". This facility was later used as a retreat for disabled soldiers and finally was rented out as apartments until the 1950s when it was razed.

During the late 1800s Bentley Springs was quite prosperous. Farmers hauled lime, fertilizer, and produce to the railroad. Saw mills produced load after load of lumber and railroad ties. Paper and grist mills flourished in the area due to the abundance of water.

Even though most of the historic buildings of Bentley Springs have long since disappeared, as you look around, the area still exudes much of the healthy country atmosphere discovered by Charles Bentley so many years ago.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1858.
 
Location. 39° 40.491′ N, 76° 40.24′ 
Trailhead sign near marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 5, 2007
3. Trailhead sign near marker
W. Marker is in Bentley Springs, Maryland, in Baltimore County. Marker can be reached from Bentley Road 0.8 miles east of Kauffman Road, on the right when traveling east. Marker is located at the Bentley Springs trailhead for the Northern Central Railroad/Torrey C. Brown Rail Trail. The trailhead is about 1.5 miles east of York Road (Maryland Route 45) via Kauffman Road and Bentley Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Parkton MD 21120, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Virginia Hall (approx. 1.4 miles away); Parkton, MD Track Chart (approx. 2.1 miles away); Freeland (approx. 2.3 miles away); Mason and Dixon Line (approx. 3.3 miles away); Mason and Dixon Mile Stone (approx. 3.3 miles away); Summit Grove (approx. 4.4 miles away in Pennsylvania); Fosters "Masemore" Mill (approx. 4˝ miles away); All Aboard! (approx. 4.8 miles away in Pennsylvania).
 
Also see . . .  Torrey C. Brown Rail Trail (Wikipedia). The Northern Central Railway, built in 1832, ran between Baltimore, Maryland, and Sunbury, Pennsylvania, and was one of the oldest rail lines in the country. The railway serviced the growing Baltimore, York and Harrisburg industries, had 46 stops, 22 of which were in Maryland, and operated for 140 years. It carried passengers, people vacationing at Bentley Springs, and freight between Baltimore and York
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or Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. (Submitted on March 21, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on March 21, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 128 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 21, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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May. 7, 2021