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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tahawus in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Heavy Construction

 
 
Heavy Construction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Steve Stoessel, March 28, 2020
1. Heavy Construction Marker
Inscription.  
Building The New Furnace
Construction began on the "new” furnace in 1849 and was completed in 1854. This furnace was the last attempt at perfection after 30 years of furnace experimentation. It was called the "new" furnace because it replaced the smaller 1844 furnace that was located in the Adirondac village.

Massive stones and imported bricks were moved and placed using the best mechanical techniques of the day, to create a structure that has endured for more than 160 years.
• Jib crane for lifting stones into place
• Workers grouting joints and "dressing" corners
• Barge unloading building materials at wharf
• Mason laying brick for the bosh
• Horse powered winch

Skilled Labor
Skilled masons and millwrights from Crown Point and Port Henry were likely employed to build the furnace. The stone is local anorthosite, split from bedrock in the area. The dressed corners and intricate archway brick patterns show a skill and pride in workmanship, and a desire to create a showcase that would attract buyers of an operation that the owners were desperate to unload.

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Erected by Open Space Institute.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce. A significant historical year for this entry is 1849.
 
Location. 44° 4.74′ N, 74° 3.401′ W. Marker is in Tahawus, New York, in Essex County. Marker is on Upper Works Road (County Route 25) 9.1 miles north of Blue Ridge Road, on the left when traveling north. Marker is part of the McIntyre Iron Works. It is on top of the embankment built for the charging bridge approximately 20 yards west and up from the road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Newcomb NY 12879, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. An Iron Making Complex (within shouting distance of this marker); “New” McIntyre Furnace (within shouting distance of this marker); Making Bricks (within shouting distance of this marker); A Monumental Structure (within shouting distance of this marker); Hudson Powered (within shouting distance of this marker); Tahawus Clubhouse (approx. half a mile away); Adirondac (approx. half a mile away); MacNaughton Cottage (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tahawus.
 
Also see . . .  Open Space Institute. (Submitted on April 6, 2020, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Northeast Corner Inset image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Steve Stoessel, March 28, 2020
2. Northeast Corner Inset
Notice drill marks in two large stones on this corner. These stones show the drilled holes where they were split from solid bedrock. A line of holes was drilled and chisels and wedges were driven into them. The chisels were hammered in sequence until the stone split off. These stones were placed upside down from their original position in the bedrock.
Tuyere Arch Inset image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Steve Stoessel, March 28, 2020
3. Tuyere Arch Inset
Arched openings on all four sides of the structure allow access to the hearth, and provide a recess for the tuyeres (nozzles that deliver blast air to the bosh). Wood forms were built inside the openings and bricks were set on top of the forms. Once the mortar set, the forms were removed.
McIntyre Iron Works image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Steve Stoessel, March 28, 2020
4. McIntyre Iron Works
Looking at the blast furnace from the start of charging bridge.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 6, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 1, 2020, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 73 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 1, 2020, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.   2, 3, 4. submitted on April 2, 2020, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 13, 2024