Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Queens in Queens County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Unisphere

Peace Through Understanding

 
 
Unisphere Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan, September 28, 2008
1. Unisphere Marker
Loated on granite base bordering the pool.
Inscription.  

Dedicated toward man's aspirations to Peace Through Understanding and symbolizing his achievements in an expanding universe.
Built and presented by the United States Steel Corporation (USS) to the New York World's Fair April 22, 1964.
Made of Stainless Steel, the Unisphere is 140' high, 120' feet in diameter and weighs 700,000 pounds.
 
Erected 1964 by United States Steel.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Notable BuildingsNotable Events.
 
Location. 40° 44.782′ N, 73° 50.705′ W. Marker is in Queens, New York, in Queens County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Meridian Road and Grand Central Parkway. Access via exit 9P of the Grand Cental Parkway. The Unisphere and marker are just east of the Queens Museum of Art (the New York City Building during the 1964/64 New York World's Fair). Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Flushing NY 11355, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. NYC Bomb and Forgery Squad Explosion Memorial (about 400 feet away,
Unisphere image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan, September 20, 2008
2. Unisphere
measured in a direct line); Tsunami Memorial (about 600 feet away); Column of Jerash (about 700 feet away); Theaterama (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Architect (approx. 0.2 miles away); Restaurant (approx. 0.2 miles away); The New York State Pavilion became a movie set (approx. 0.2 miles away); Live Performances (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Queens.
 
More about this marker. The Unisphere was the symbol of the 1964/65 New York World's Fair and was granted landmark status by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 10, 1995.
 
Regarding Unisphere. Extensive information about the Unisphere and the 1964/65 New York World's Fair can be found at: www.nywf64.com
 
Also see . . .  Unisphere. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on April 18, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Additional keywords. Flushing Meadows Corona Park
 
Unisphere image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
3. Unisphere
The fountain under the Unisphere is no longer operational and is not being maintained by the Parks Department.
Unisphere image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
4. Unisphere
View from under the Unisphere looking upwards.
Unisphere image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
5. Unisphere
Its rings represent the orbits of the first American astronaut, the first Russian cosmonaut and the first communications satellite to orbit the Earth.
Unisphere image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
6. Unisphere
When the Unisphere was constructed, there were lights all over the sphere representing world capitols. Over the decades, vandals have destroyed the electrical wiring that powered the lamps.
Unisphere image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
7. Unisphere
Alternate view of Unisphere seen from below the sphere.
The Unisphere, 1965 image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 1965
8. The Unisphere, 1965
The fountains have been repaired and were running for the All-Star Game Weekend, 2013. image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 13, 2013
9. The fountains have been repaired and were running for the All-Star Game Weekend, 2013.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 14, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 3, 2009, by Mary Ellen Coghlan of Warwick, New York. This page has been viewed 1,055 times since then and 20 times this year. Last updated on April 18, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 3, 2009, by Mary Ellen Coghlan of Warwick, New York.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on August 10, 2009, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.   8, 9. submitted on April 18, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 10, 2020