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Rossville in Fayette County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Skirmish at Lafayette Station

 
 
The Skirmish at Lafayette Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 18, 2020
1. The Skirmish at Lafayette Station Marker
Front side
Inscription.  
(side 1)
On December 27, 1863 Lafayette Station (now known as Rossville) saw the culmination of an incredible month in West Tennessee history. It began with a Presidential order giving General Bedford Forrest an independent command. The General wished to break the invading Federal Army's occupation and control of West Tennessee. He needed more troops, food, horses, and arms. Arriving from Okolona, Mississippi, on December second with four hundred fifty men, five wagons, and two cannonthey moved into West Tennessee . By Christmas day recruiting had swelled the force to 3500 men. Thirty five Federal wagons had been captured along with two hundred head of cattle and three hundred hogs. Federal General S.A. Hurlbut under orders from General W.T. Sherman had amassed 20,000 men from the 16th Army Corps to trap General Forrest and block his return to Mississippi. After forty days of rain the river was very high. All bridges over the Wolf river from Memphis to Corinth were ordered
(Continued on other side)
(side 2)
(Continued from other side)
burned. The bridge here had been dismantled
The Skirmish at Lafayette Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 18, 2020
2. The Skirmish at Lafayette Station Marker
Reverse side
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rather than burned. Boards were stacked within the fort on this side of the river. Piers and beams were still standing. A diversion Confederate force of 700 was sent to cross the Raleigh ferry to make a feint at Memphis and strike out to the South. Two hundred Confederates attacked the Fort here. Most were unarmed, but they came suddenly and loudly. The Federals abandoned the Fort leaving four dead and fled towards Moscow. Fifty Confederates were in pursuit when a train load of Federals from Lagrange appeared. After firing upon the train it retreated and the Confederates tore up the tracks. The bridge here was reassembled and General Forrest led the troops , most on foot, back to Mississippi. The escape was complete. No Confederates were wounded or killed. The following month, General Forrest was promoted to Major-General and Hurlbut was relieved of duty by General Sherman.
 
Erected 2002 by Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp 1560 and Rossville Historic District.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is December 27, 1863.
 
Location. 35° 2.931′ N, 89° 32.541′ W. Marker is in Rossville, Tennessee, in Fayette County. Marker is on Church Street (Tennessee Route 194) north of Front Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rossville TN 38066, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
The Skirmish at Lafayette Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 18, 2020
3. The Skirmish at Lafayette Station Marker
markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. "Mississippi" Fred McDowell (approx. half a mile away); Collierville Christian Church (approx. 6.9 miles away); The Original Village (approx. 6.9 miles away); Collierville, Tennessee Veterans Memorial (approx. 6.9 miles away); The Wigfall Grays (approx. 6.9 miles away); Memphis & Charleston Railroad (approx. 6.9 miles away); History Of The Collierville Town Square (approx. 6.9 miles away); The Battle of Collierville (approx. 6.9 miles away).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 19, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 99 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 19, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Sep. 24, 2021