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Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Shelby County Hospital / Shelby County Center

 
 
Shelby County Hospital side of marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 25, 2020
1. Shelby County Hospital side of marker
Inscription.  
Shelby County Hospital
Completed in June of 1935, the Shelby County Hospital at Shelby Farms was built here as a replacement for both the much older Shelby County Hospital, located on the workhouse grounds at Jackson Avenue, and the "County Emergency Hospital" (or Isolation Hospital) on Hindman-Ferry Road at the County Cemetery in Frayser. Originally set on a 65-acre landscaped tract, the Shelby County Hospital was designed for a capacity of 800 beds with nearly 3 1/2 acres of floor space and a 600-person chapel. A 20-year county loan for $397,000 and a federal Public Works Administration grant provided the necessary $522,000 required to construct the hospital. Architect W.J. Hanker designed the building, with project leadership provided by Shelby County Commission Chairman E.W. Hale and State PWA Engineer, Major Thomas H. Allen.

Shelby County Center
This building served as the Shelby County Hospital and Health Care Center for two-thirds of a century (1935-2001) before its transitional reuse as an office building for various county government services and agencies. Beginning in 1870,
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Shelby County had built a "Poor House" on the Raleigh Road (Jackson Avenue) for indigent and ill citizens. Replaced in 1890 by a hospital and insane asylum, these facilities were superseded by this hospital building at this location. After the demand for beds peaked in 1990 when private nursing homes began to accept indigent patients with government insurance, Shelby County Services Director Peggy W. Edmiston noted the change in needs and recommended the building for other uses. Shelby County Mayor Jim Rout called for the conversion of this well-constructed building, located in the geographical center of the county, into an Administrative Center. The last patient transferred in August 2001.
 
Erected by Shelby County.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Science & Medicine. A significant historical month for this entry is June 1935.
 
Location. 35° 9.325′ N, 89° 51.285′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker can be reached from State Road, 0.1 miles west of Mullins Station Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1075 Mullins Station Road, Memphis TN 38134, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Nashoba (approx. 1.4 miles away); The Lynching of Ell Persons (approx. 1.4 miles away); a different marker also named The Lynching of Ell Persons
Shelby County Center side of marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 25, 2020
2. Shelby County Center side of marker
(approx. 1˝ miles away); Bridgewater School (approx. 1.6 miles away); The Lynching of Wash Henley (approx. 1.6 miles away); Christian Brothers High School / Christian Brothers Band (approx. 1.8 miles away); First Holiday Inn (approx. 2.4 miles away); Mullins United Methodist Church (approx. 3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Memphis.
 
Shelby County Hospital image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, April 25, 2020
3. Shelby County Hospital
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 28, 2020, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 871 times since then and 148 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 28, 2020, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 24, 2024