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Woodbury in Cannon County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Woodbury in the Civil War

"A Brilliant Little Affair"

 
 
Woodbury in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, May 17, 2020
1. Woodbury in the Civil War Marker
Inscription.  Woodbury, located on the Murfreesboro-McMinnville Turnpike, experienced two significant Civil War actions in 1862–1863.

On July 12–13, 1862, when Confederate Col. Nathan Bedford Forrest marched through Cannon County to raid Murfreesboro, he and his men bivouacked on Woodbury's eastern outskirts. Confederate Col. Baxter Smith wrote that the troops "reached Woodbury about midnight, where the whole population of the town seemed to be on the streets.” The Confederates attacked the Federal garrison in Murfreesboro, capturing about 1,200 Union soldiers and rescuing prisoners, including several prominent county residents.

After the Battle of Stone's River early in 1863, Union troops occupied the county, first camping at Readyville. Fighting became almost a daily affair. Union lieutenant and future author Ambrose Bierce, 9th Indiana Infantry, wrote, "Connecting Readyville and Woodbury was a good, hard turnpike nine or ten miles long. ... For months after the big battle at Stones River these outposts were in constant quarrel, most of the trouble occurring, naturally, on the turnpike mentioned, between detachments
Col. Nathan B. Forrest image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Library of Congress
2. Col. Nathan B. Forrest
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of cavalry."

A January 1863 skirmish on Woodbury's western side pitted Confederate Col. John B. Hutcheson's 2nd Kentucky Cavalry against four Union regiments in Col. William B. Hazen's command. Hutcheson had sworn, "I have on numerous occasions promised the people of Woodbury that no live Yankee should come into that town unless over my dead body, and I am going to keep my promise.” Hutcheson died in the fighting. Union Capt. T.D. McClelland of the 3rd Ohio Cavalry described the victory as "quite a brilliant little affair."
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical date for this entry is July 12, 1862.
 
Location. 35° 49.674′ N, 86° 4.219′ W. Marker is in Woodbury, Tennessee, in Cannon County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street (U.S. 70S) and North Cannon Street, on the right when traveling west on West Main Street. Marker is on southeastern side of courthouse grounds. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 West Main Street, Woodbury TN 37190, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. World War I-II Memorial (a few steps from this marker); East Fork Stone's River (within shouting distance of this marker);
Ambrose Bierce image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Library of Congress
3. Ambrose Bierce
Early Industry (within shouting distance of this marker); Highway 70S Mile Marker Stone (within shouting distance of this marker); Forrest Rested Here (approx. 0.7 miles away); The Trail of Tears (approx. 0.7 miles away); Cannon County Confederate Monument (approx. 0.9 miles away); "Mister Jim" Cummings (approx. 2.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Woodbury.
 
Gen. William B. Hazen image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Library of Congress
4. Gen. William B. Hazen
Woodbury in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, May 17, 2020
5. Woodbury in the Civil War Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 25, 2020. It was originally submitted on May 25, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 217 times since then and 132 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 25, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Nov. 28, 2021