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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
White Sands Proving Grounds in Socorro County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Trinity Site

 
 
Trinity Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, July 1, 2019
1. Trinity Site Marker
Inscription.  The nuclear age began with the detonation of the world's first atomic bomb at the Trinity Site on July 16, 1945. J. Robert Oppenheimer, director of the Manhattan Project's Los Alamos Laboratory, stated that he suggested "Trinity, "perhaps from the poetry of John Donne, After the blast, he was said to have recalled the line from the Bhagavad Gita," Now, I am Become Death, the destroyer of worlds.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Science & MedicineWar, World II. A significant historical month for this entry is July 1945.
 
Location. 33° 53.067′ N, 106° 40.3′ W. Marker is in White Sands Proving Grounds, New Mexico, in Socorro County. Marker is on U.S. 380 near WSMR P Route 7 (State Road 525). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Antonio NM 87832, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Carthage-Tokay-Farley (approx. 3.1 miles away); San Pedro (approx. 10.2 miles away); San Antonio (approx. 11.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. A newer marker has been placed with updated wording. Back side with map has not changed.
 
Additional commentary.
1. Trinity Site
The first atomic bomb
Previous Trinity Site Marker image. Click for full size.
2004
2. Previous Trinity Site Marker
The world's first atomic explosion occurred on July 16, 1945, at the Trinity Site near the north end of the historic Jornada del Muerto. It marked the beginning of the nuclear age, and the culmination of the Manhattan Project. The site, now part of the White Sands Missile Range, is closed to the public.
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was tested at 5:29:45 A.M. Mountain War Time on July 16, 1945. It was a 19 kiloton explosion that ended the war in the Pacific but also brought the world into the atomic age. The explosion took up a 51,500 acre area. The site is now a Historical and National Landmark, and is on what is now White Sand Missile Range. It is open to the public twice a year.
    — Submitted October 24, 2012.
 
Trinity Site Marker reverse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 21, 2011
3. Trinity Site Marker reverse
Trinity Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, July 1, 2019
4. Trinity Site Marker
Trinity Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, July 1, 2019
5. Trinity Site Marker
Previous Trinity Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 21, 2011
6. Previous Trinity Site Marker
View east on US-380. Not much has changed since 2004.
Previous Trinity Site Marker image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of Elizabeth Winter, November 18, 2020
7. Previous Trinity Site Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 18, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 5, 2009, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,507 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 18, 2020, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on January 5, 2009, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   3. submitted on July 28, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   4, 5. submitted on December 18, 2020, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   6. submitted on July 28, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   7. submitted on November 18, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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