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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Henrico in Henrico County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
REMOVED
SEE LOCATION SECTION
 

Empty Victory

Fort Hoke – 1864

 
 
Empty Victory Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. Empty Victory Marker
Inscription.  After capturing Fort Harrison on September 29, 1864, Union troops continued their attack against the Confederate lines that connected Fort Harrison to the James River. Here at Fort Hoke a small collection of Virginia artillerists tried valiantly to stop the Union advance. Their fire seriously wounded General E.O.C. Ord, the Union 18th Corps commander.

Ord’s men overwhelmed the Confederate defenders, then occupied the fort until orders arrived to withdraw back to Fort Harrison. Fort Hoke then became the southern anchor for a new Confederate defensive line that protected Richmond until the capital was evacuated in April 1865.
 
Erected by Richmond National Battlefield Park - National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1865.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 37° 25.06′ N, 77° 23.148′ W. Marker was near Henrico, Virginia, in Henrico County. Marker was at the intersection
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of Battlefield Park Road and Hoke Brady Road, on the left when traveling south on Battlefield Park Road. Marker is in the Fort Hoke Unit of the Richmond National Battlefield Park. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Henrico VA 23231, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Fort Hoke: Empty Victory (within shouting distance of this marker); Storming the Fort (approx. 0.9 miles away); Well (approx. 0.9 miles away); Confederate Trenches (approx. 0.9 miles away); Bombproof and Casemate (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Fort Parapet (approx. 0.9 miles away); Bombproof (approx. 0.9 miles away); Building Fort Burnham (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Henrico.
 
More about this marker. The bottom of the marker features a picture of Confederate soldiers manning a cannon at Fort Hoke. It has a caption of “On September 29, 1864, Fort Hoke had about four cannon and 75 men to defend this position.”
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. New Marker At This Location titled "Fort Hoke: Empty Victory".
 
Also see . . .
1. Battlefield Tour - Ft Gilmer to Ft Brady. Richmond National Battlefield Park website. (Submitted on January 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.) 

2. Fort Harrison. Richmond
Empty Victory Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, March 21, 2010
2. Empty Victory Marker
Battlefields Fort Harrison website. (Submitted on January 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.) 
 
Fort Hoke Fortifications image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
3. Fort Hoke Fortifications
These Confederate earthworks, which were taken and later abandoned by Union troops on September 29, 1864, are located next to the marker.
Confederate Fort Hoke image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
4. Confederate Fort Hoke
Richmond National Battlefield Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
5. Richmond National Battlefield Park
Marker is in the Fort Hoke Unit of the Richmond National Battlefield Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 5, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,075 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   2. submitted on August 22, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on January 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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Mar. 4, 2024