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Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Second Infantry Division Memorial

 
 
Second Infantry Division Memorial - center section from 1936 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 2, 2009
1. Second Infantry Division Memorial - center section from 1936
The flaming bronze sword by James Earle Fraser is symbolic of the division's role as an impediment to the German advance on Paris in 1918.
Inscription.  
[From 1936:]

The Second Division
To Our Honored Dead, 1917-1919

Toulon
Troyon
Bois de Belleau
Vaux
Soissons

Marache
St. Mihiel
Blanc Mont
Meuse-Argonne
The Rhine

[From 1962, west inner wing:]

Organized in France in October, 1917; original unit consisted of Army, Marine and Navy troops.

[From 1962, west outer wing:]

Normandy
Rhineland
Brest
Remagen
Siegfried Line
Leipzig
The Bulge
Czechoslovakia

[From 1962, east inner wing:]

United Nations battalion assisted [the] division in Korean War - from France, The Netherlands, Thailand.

[From 1962, east outer wing:]

Natong River
Bloody Ridge
Kuni-Ri
Heartbreak Ridge
Chipyong-Ni
Old Baldy
Wang-Ju
Arrowhead Ridge

[Cornerstone:]
1936, 1962

 
Erected 1936.
 
Location. 38° 53.555′ N, 77° 2.278′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington
Left Outside Panel image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2008
2. Left Outside Panel
Indicates years of the Korea War service.
. Marker is on Constitution Avenue Northwest (U.S. 50) east of 17th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20006, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bulfinch Gate House (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Ysabel I, La Catolica (about 500 feet away); The German-American Friendship Garden (about 500 feet away); The Home of the Pan American Union (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named German-American Friendship Garden (about 500 feet away); The Canal Connection (about 600 feet away); Lock Keeper’s House (about 600 feet away); The Washington City Canal (about 600 feet away).
 
More about this memorial. The Memorial is on the Ellipse, south of the White House.
 
Also see . . .
1. 2nd Infantry Division. (Submitted on January 5, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. James Earle Fraser (sculptor). (Submitted on January 6, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. 2ID Association. (Submitted on January 6, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Marines and Sailors in the 2nd Infantry Division, U.S.A.

At the time of its activation during WWI, the Division included the 3d Infantry Brigade, a regular organic Army brigade which included the 9th and 23rd Infantry Regiments; and the 4th Marine Brigade, which consisted of
Right Outside Panel image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2008
3. Right Outside Panel
Indicating World War II service years.
the 5th the 6th Marine Regiments. Twice during "The Great War" the division was commanded by Marine Corps generals, Brigadier General Charles A. Doyen and Major General John A. Lejeune, the only time in U.S. Military history when Marine Corps officers commanded an Army division. Although the Marines comprised less than half of one division out of 90-plus divisions in the American Expeditionary Force, they are remembered for receiving what seemed to be more publicity than did rest of the AEF put together, a sore point in inter-service relations that continued for the rest of the century.

Meanwhile, the Navy hospital corpsmen who served heroically with the 4th Marine Brigade were subsequently authorized to wear a special strap on the left shoulder of their "dress blue" uniforms in order to accommodate the French Fourragere earned by the brigade, the only Navy men to ever be so privileged.

(Ironically, units of the the 2ID would fight under Marine Corps command in Iraq in 2004 attached to the 1st Marine Division.)
    — Submitted January 6, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.

 
Additional keywords. "Indian Head Division"; "2ID"; "Second to None", 4th Marine Brigade; KATUSAs; James Earle Fraser; Operation
Second Infantry Division Memorial - west wing addition, 1962 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 2, 2009
4. Second Infantry Division Memorial - west wing addition, 1962
honoring the 2ID's dead from World War II.
Iraqi Freedom; American Expeditionary Force (AEF).

 
Categories. War, 2nd IraqWar, KoreanWar, World IWar, World II
 
Second Infantry Division Memorial - east wing addition, 1962 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 2, 2009
5. Second Infantry Division Memorial - east wing addition, 1962
honoring the 2ID's dead from the Korean War.

The more than 7,000 combat deaths suffered by the 2nd Division in Korea remain the highest total for any modern U.S. division in any war; and its 17000-plus combat deaths in World War I, World II, and Korea (a figure exceeding its average combat strength) are the greatest combined total for any U.S. division.
Left Corner Stone image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2008
6. Left Corner Stone
Second Infantry Division Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 2, 2009
7. Second Infantry Division Memorial
Close Up of the "Indian Head" Symbol on the Sword image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2008
8. Close Up of the "Indian Head" Symbol on the Sword
 

More. Search the internet for Second Infantry Division Memorial.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 5, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 5,327 times since then and 5 times this year. Last updated on January 6, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on January 5, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2, 3. submitted on January 7, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on January 5, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6. submitted on January 7, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on January 6, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   8. submitted on January 7, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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