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St. Charles in St. Charles County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Historic Frenchtown

 
 
Historic Frenchtown Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Jason Voigt, June 3, 2020
1. Historic Frenchtown Marker
Inscription.  
North 2nd Street Shops
North Second Street was a bustling thriving commercial district. Butchers, bakers, tinsmiths and saddle makers all had shops on the street; many lived above them on the second floor. Farmers brought their grain to the mill located in the 900 block and stayed at the boarding house at the corner of French and Second Street.

Jean Baptiste Pointe Du Sable
A Well known person associated with Frenchtown is Jean Baptiste Pointe Du Sable, a fur trader of French and African descent who founded Chicago and spent his last ten years in a brick house at the corner of Third and Deactur Street. Du Sable is also buried in the St. Charles Borromeo Cemetery.

Traditional Frenchtown Architecture
The Frenchtown neighborhood owes its name to the early French settlers who founded St. Charles and to our distinctive style of architecture. The district has the largest concentration of French-Colonial style architecture in the Midwest. These simple structures, constructed from about 1820-1850, feature an extended main roof over raised open air galleried front porches. They are also often
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mistaken for duplexes because of their double front doors accessing both the living and dining rooms located on the main level.

American Car Foundry [ACF] Building
The St. Charles Car Company, organized in 1872 and purchased by the American Car Foundry [ACF] in 1899 is located between Second Street and the Missouri River. By the 1890s it employed more than 1800 men and was known worldwide as a leader in streetcar and railcar design. By 1910 at least one member of every household in Frenchtown worked at ACF. By WWI, they manufactured more than 50,000 army escort wagons. During WWII they produced hospital cars and eleven tanks a day rolled out of their shops.

Lewis & Clark
Lewis and Clark dined at a home in Frenchtown before departing on their exploration westward. A note in their journal describes St. Charles as having "about 100 houses, the most of them small and indefferent and about 450 inhabitents. Chiefly French, those people appear pore, polite, and harmonious."

Wabash Railroad Bridge
The arrival of the railroad and large wave of German immigration in the 1830s were spurred by the publication of Gottfried Duden and Louis Eversman's account of the new frontier. By the mid 1800, Frenchtown was a "city within the city".
 
Erected by City of St. Charles, Missouri
Historic Frenchtown Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Jason Voigt, June 3, 2020
2. Historic Frenchtown Marker
At St. Charles Ecopark
.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansArchitectureBridges & ViaductsExplorationIndustry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars. In addition, it is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition series list.
 
Location. 38° 47.736′ N, 90° 28.509′ W. Marker is in St. Charles, Missouri, in St. Charles County. Marker is on North 2nd Street (State Highway 94) just north of Wilkinson Street, on the right when traveling north. Marker is located at St. Charles Ecopark. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1802 N 2nd St, Saint Charles MO 63301, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Missouri River floods (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. Charles Ecopark (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1314 N. 3rd (approx. ¼ mile away); 1310 North Third Street (approx. 0.3 miles away); Frenchtown Neighborhood (approx. 0.4 miles away); John Borgemeier House 1852 (approx. half a mile away); What Happens When Wetlands Are Lost? (approx. half a mile away); Bales Wetland (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Charles.
 
Also see . . .  Frenchtown Historic District on Wikipedia. (Submitted on June 6, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.)
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Credits. This page was last revised on June 7, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 6, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. This page has been viewed 343 times since then and 84 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 6, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 20, 2024