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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rocky Point in Queens County, Prince Edward Island — The Atlantic Provinces
 

Michel Haché-Gallant et Anne Cormier

 
 
Michel Haché-Gallant et Anne Cormier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2019
1. Michel Haché-Gallant et Anne Cormier Marker
Inscription.  
Français:
Première famille acadienne
établie en permanence à
L’Île-du-Prince-Édouard
Ancêtres des familles
Gallant et Haché
du Canada et des États-Unis
arrivés à Port-La-Joye en 1720
Monument érigé en 1965 par leurs
descendants


English:
First Acadian family permanently
settled in Prince Edward Island
Ancestors of the
Gallant and Haché families
of Canada and the United States
arrived at Port-La-Joye in 1720.
This monument erected in 1965
by their descendants

 
Erected 1965 by Gallant & Haché family descendants.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1720.
 
Location. 46° 11.731′ N, 63° 8.157′ W. Marker is in Rocky Point, Prince Edward Island, in Queens County. Marker can be reached from Hache Gallant Drive 1.2 kilometers east of Prince Edward Island Route 19, on the left when traveling east. Marker is located
Michel Haché-Gallant et Anne Cormier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2019
2. Michel Haché-Gallant et Anne Cormier Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
near the walkway, in front of the visitor center, at Skmaqn–Port-la-Joye–Fort Amherst National Historic Site. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 191 Hache Gallant Drive, Rocky Point, Prince Edward Island C0A 1H2, Canada. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Place Yourself in History / Situez-vous dans l’histoire (a few steps from this marker); The Deportation of the Inhabitants of Île Saint-Jean (a few steps from this marker); Port-la-Joye – Fort Amherst (a few steps from this marker); The Mi'kmaq / Les Mi'kmaq (within shouting distance of this marker); Port of Entry / Port d’entrée (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); The British Period / La période britannique (about 150 meters away); A Great Survey / Un Arpentage de Taille (about 150 meters away); The Grand Dérangement (about 180 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rocky Point.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Skmaqn–Port-la-Joye–Fort Amherst National Historic Site
 
Also see . . .
1. Michel Haché-Gallant. After the loss of Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal, N.S.) to the English under Francis Nicholson in 1710 and the subsequent cession of Acadia to England by the treaty of Utrecht in 1713, a number of Acadians moved to the nearby French possessions of Île Royale (Cape Breton Island) and Île Saint-Jean. Michel Haché was among these;
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in 1720 he moved with his family to Île Saint-Jean and settled at Port La Joie (near Charlottetown), a settlement which had just been founded. He was named port captain of Port La Joie about that time, and he and his wife were among the most respected settlers there. (Submitted on June 24, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Life and Times of Michel Haché-Gallant. Michel Haché‚ was married in 1690 to Anne Marie Claire Cormier, born about 1674 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia. Censuses and religious records from the era permit a reconstruction of Haché's family. There were 12 children, 7 boys and 5 girls. Life in Acadia was very rugged. There were few conveniences. The main method of transportation was by canoe along the rivers and streams of the area. The major possessions were family and rifles. Before horses and oxen were imported, the mother had to pull the plow, while the father pushed the plow with one hand while holding his rifle with the other. There were some hostile natives about and packs of wolves were everywhere. (Submitted on June 24, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 24, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 23, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 85 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 24, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Apr. 23, 2021