Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Stevensburg in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Civil War in Stevensburg

Entertainment and Music

— Winter Encampment —

 
 
The Civil War in Stevensburg Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, June 20, 2020
1. The Civil War in Stevensburg Marker
Inscription.  Music, reading and letter writing were all important pastimes for Civil War soldiers throughout their military service, and winter encampments offered extra time for these activities. While many soldiers kept to those pastimes, the town had a reputation for gambling, cockfighting, and horseracing. Stevensburg was a well-known crossroads in the years before the war, and Culpeper County became a stopping point once again in 1863 for the Union's Army of the Potomac. Brigadier General Judson Kilpatrick and his 3rd Division Cavalry regularly held horse races on the property of Rose Hill during the 1863-1864 winter encampment. A former camp for wagon teams transporting goods, known as Wicket Bottom, earned its name from the gambling that took place there.

Bands continued to form or re-enlist throughout the winter, filling the military streets with music. It was crucial to the success of each army to re-enlist soldiers during the winter months, and bands were an important part of that effort. The sounds of camps were dramatically altered through their presence - amidst the chatter, wagons, and everyday noise, instruments provided familiar sounds
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
of home and life beyond the battlefield.

Some regiments sent members to acquire new instruments while in winter quarters, and soldiers often traveled to neighboring camps to listen to regimental brass bands. There was a makeshift outdoor amphitheater on Hansbrough's Ridge and many documents refer to soldiers singing in camp. In some cases, popular songs like Home, Sweet Home and Auld Lang Syne were banned for causing homesickness. Meanwhile, military songs drove practice drills during the long winter and provided inspiration for patriotism on both sides. On May 4, 1864, regimental bands alerted both armies armies that the winter encampment had ended and the Overland Campaign had begun.

Sidebar:
Taverns were important in Stevensburg and its surroundings. Willis Madden, a free man of both African and European ancestry, owned one of the county's most popular taverns which he opened in 1835 east of Hansbrough's Ridge. His mother, Sarah Madden, was indentured to James Madison's father and lived in Stevensburg after the completion of her indenture. Willis Madden and his family ran a blacksmith shop, a general store, and a camping site at the tavern. During the winter of 1863-1864, the Union army destroyed all of Madden's outbuldings, cleared the land of timber, and slaughtered his livestock. The tavern closed and Madden was compensated $879 in 1873
Regimental Band in the Union Army image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, June 20, 2020
2. Regimental Band in the Union Army
(Courtesy of the Library of Congress)
for the destruction of his property, only a third of its value.
 
Erected 2020 by Virginia Department of Transportation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is May 4, 1864.
 
Location. 38° 26.504′ N, 77° 53.449′ W. Marker is in Stevensburg, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is at the intersection of York Road (State Road 600) and Germanna Highway (State Highway 3), on the right when traveling east on York Road. Located at an interpretive pull off on the east end of Stevensburg. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Stevensburg VA 22741, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Civil War in Stevensburg (here, next to this marker); Battlefield Preservation (here, next to this marker); Religion in Stevensburg (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Civil War in Stevensburg (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Religion in Stevensburg (a few steps from this marker); Historic Stevensburg (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Civil War in Stevensburg (a few steps from this marker); Welcome to Historic Stevensburg, Virginia (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stevensburg.
 
Madden's Tavern image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, June 20, 2020
3. Madden's Tavern
Map showing the location of Madden's Tavern and Stevensburg, c. 1862 (from the We Were Always Free, the Maddens of Culpeper County, Virginia by T.O. Madden, Jr.)
Stevensburg Interpretive Pulloff image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, June 20, 2020
4. Stevensburg Interpretive Pulloff
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 12, 2020, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 313 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 12, 2020, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on July 13, 2020, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on July 12, 2020, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=152629

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 17, 2024