Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

American Red Cross, Galveston County Chapter

 
 
American Red Cross, Galveston County Chapter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, July 19, 2000
1. American Red Cross, Galveston County Chapter Marker
Inscription.  

Within days of the devastating storm of 1900 Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross, arrived in Galveston with personnel, supplies, and relief funds. Assisting the relief effort, which included Galveston Island and several mainland counties, was a group of Galveston women who formed a Red Cross auxiliary and operated distribution centers throughout the area. Galveston County's American Red Cross Chapter was formally established in 1916. The chapter established branch organizations throughout the area in support of servicemen and women during World War I.

Since its formation the Galveston County chapter has been at the forefront of countless relief efforts in response to regional, state, national, and world disasters. It established relief shelters and food distribution centers during the Great Depression, provided goods and services for servicemen and women during World War II, inventoried and distributed medical and other disaster relief supplies to victims of the Texas City harbor explosion of 1947, and provides groceries and other supplies to victims of hurricanes along the Texas Gulf Coast. Galveston County's
American Red Cross, Galveston County Chapter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, July 19, 2000
2. American Red Cross, Galveston County Chapter Marker
The Red Cross marker is on the nearest object to the camera. The Original Seawall marker is just past the picnic table.
chapter joined the Greater Houston Area Chapter of the American Red Cross in 1987.

Marker is property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 1994 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 9921.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Charity & Public Work. In addition, it is included in the Clara Barton series list.
 
Location. 29° 16.364′ N, 94° 48.906′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is on Seawall Boulivard ¼ mile east of Fort Crockeett Boulevard, on the right when traveling east. The marker is on the seawall itself. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Galveston TX 77551, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Original Galveston Seawall (a few steps from this marker); Galveston Seawall and Grade Raising (a few steps from this marker); Beach Invertebrates (within shouting distance of this marker); The Birds of Galveston (within shouting distance of this marker); Campeche / Galveston Island (within shouting distance of this marker); Peter Leroy Colombo (approx. half a mile away); Burial Site of David G. Burnet (1788-1870) (approx. 0.6 miles away); "Ducky's Beach" (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
1900 Storm Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, July 19, 2000
3. 1900 Storm Memorial
The statue is in memory of the victims lost at sea during the Galveston hurricane of September 8, 1900. A "Place of Remembrance" to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of the storm.

The 1900 storm virtually destroyed the City of Galveston. It caused the most deaths of any natural disaster in United States history, even up to today.

The 10-foot-tall bronze sculpture portrays a family - a father, mother and child - clinging together. One of the man's arms is reaching for the sky, and the other is around his wife. She is cradling their baby in her arms.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 19, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 51 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 19, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Jan. 25, 2021