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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Dallas in Dallas County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Caruth House

 
 
Caruth House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, August 3, 2020
1. Caruth House Marker
Inscription.  

Brothers and merchants William B. and Walter Caruth purchased land here in 1852. In 1872, William and his wife Mattie (Worthington) built this house, which stayed in the family until 2000. Mattie designed a Victorian-style home after the grand plantation homes of her Mississippi childhood. A 1938 renovation created a Neoclassical design, with removal of a wraparound porch, addition of a sleeping porch and sunroom, and relocation of the kitchen/dining wing. The two-story side-gabled home features a full-facade porch with fluted ionic columns and significant original features, such as frame siding, deep-bracketed gable eaves and window crowns.
Recorded Texas historic landmark - 1962.
Marker is property of the State of Texas

 
Erected 1962 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 6638.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Architecture.
 
Location. 32° 51.654′ N, 96° 46.465′ W. Marker is in Dallas, Texas, in Dallas County. Marker can be reached from Cornerstone
Caruth House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, August 3, 2020
2. Caruth House Marker
Parkway. The marker is behind locked gates. To access, you'll need to contact the Communities Foundation of Texas. They will let you in to see the house and Marker. The Foundation allows the house and grounds to be open for public tours on certain occasions. https://www.cftexas.org/. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8000 Cornerstone Parkway, Dallas TX 75225, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mickey Charles Mantle (approx. 0.6 miles away); John Goodwin Tower (approx. 0.6 miles away); Caruth Pioneer Cemetery (approx. 0.6 miles away); Daniel Family Cemetery (approx. one mile away); Zion Lutheran Church (approx. 1.1 miles away); Dallas Hall Southern Methodist University (approx. 1.2 miles away); St. Paul's Evangelical and Reformed Church (approx. 1.6 miles away); Highland Park Methodist Church (approx. 1.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dallas.
 
Caruth House image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, August 3, 2020
3. Caruth House
Caruth House image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, August 3, 2020
4. Caruth House
Caruth House image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, August 3, 2020
5. Caruth House
Additional Caruth House sign image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, August 3, 2020
6. Additional Caruth House sign
In 2000, Communities Foundation of Texas purchased the Caruth Homeplace and began creating plans to restore the historic property. From the earliest days of Dallas, the Caruth Homeplace - also historically called Caruth Hill - had been the family home and farm headquarters of one of Dallas' most prominent families. As farmers, ranchers, business leaders, developers, builders, and community leaders, the Caruth Family reflected and made Dallas history. Most significantly, the family gave back through their remarkable philanthropic commitments and endowments, the latter managed today by Communities Foundation of Texas. William Barr Caruth and his wife Mattie Worthington Caruth built the original Victorian home, called the Main House, in the 1870's. In 1938, their only child, William Walter Caruth (Will, Sr.) and his wife Earle Clark Caruth completely renovated the home to create a stately Neoclassical exterior with two-story Ionic columns. Completed in 2010, the Caruth Homeplace Project fully restored the home and its immediate grounds to honor the Caruth Family and celebrate Dallas history, while serving the CFT mission to empower philanthropy and meet community needs.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 8, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 7, 2020, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. This page has been viewed 73 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 7, 2020, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 25, 2021