Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Lewiston in Niagara County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Bridge Ruins

 
 
Bridge Ruins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, August 8, 2020
1. Bridge Ruins Marker
Trolleys had stopped crossing the bridge before ending service altogether in 1935.
Inscription.  
Bridge Ruins
Second Lewiston-Queenston
bridge, 1899-1962, carried
seasonal tourist trolleys
across gorge, forming
the Great Gorge Belt Line.

 
Erected 2020 by William G. Pomeroy Foundation. (Marker Number 612.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Bridges & ViaductsRailroads & Streetcars. In addition, it is included in the William G. Pomeroy Foundation series list.
 
Location. 43° 9.91′ N, 79° 2.788′ W. Marker is in Lewiston, New York, in Niagara County. Marker can be reached from South 4th Street ¾ mile south of Tuscarora Street. Marker is in Artpark State Park. From the main parking area, walk south along the road that ascends the Niagara Escarpment. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 450 South 4th Street, Lewiston NY 14092, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Niagara Gorge R.R. (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Demler (within shouting distance of this marker); The Gully and Portage Road (within
Bridge Ruins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, August 8, 2020
2. Bridge Ruins Marker
shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Earl W. Brydges Artpark State Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lower Landing Archeological District (about 300 feet away); The Lower Landing (about 400 feet away); The Magazin Royale (about 600 feet away); Fort Joncaire (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lewiston.
 
More about this marker. Artpark set the marker in 2020. The grant for the marker was solicited by the Niagara Frontier Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society from the William G. Pomeroy Foundation.
 
Regarding Bridge Ruins. This is not where the deck of the bridge met land. The deck ends were in the gorge. Vehicles exiting the bridge deck turned sharply at the gorge wall, traveling on a ledge leading out of the gorge.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lewiston-Queenston Bridge - Wikipedia. This Wikipedia entry for the current Lewiston-Queenston Bridge (an arch bridge) includes information about the two predecessor suspension bridges. (Submitted on August 11, 2020, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.) 

2. Niagara Gorge Beltline book - Niagara Frontier Chapter, NRHS. (Submitted on August 11, 2020, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
3. Plaques Commemorate Niagara Gorge Scenic Railway at Artpark State Park
Bridge Ruins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, August 8, 2020
3. Bridge Ruins Marker
Eastward view of the marker with bridge anchor in foreground.
. 2020 article by Joshua Maloni in the Niagara Wheatfield/North Tonawanda Tribune. (Submitted on September 21, 2020, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.) 
 
Bridge Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, August 8, 2020
4. Bridge Ruins
The fenced sculpture built upon the bridge towers is called Omega. The land in the background is Queenston (Queenston Heights), Ontario, Canada. Brock's Monument is in the distant background.
Bridge Ruins Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, August 8, 2020
5. Bridge Ruins Cornerstone
This cornerstone of the south tower is apparently for the first Lewiston-Queenston suspension bridge.
Trolley Grade image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, September 2, 2018
6. Trolley Grade
This is where the trolley tracks separated, at the north end of the Niagara Gorge. The view is northward and towards where the track switch was located, just before a bridge over a gully. The lower grade ran along and inside the gorge to Niagara Falls. The higher grade, behind the stone wall, ran to the deck of the suspension bridge, joined by the road for rubber-wheeled vehicles. The higher grade is now blocked by overgrowth and by fill from the Niagara Power Project. The lower grade has been narrowed by erosion and severed by the Project. I was able to walk it to where it had ducked under the bridge, but it is risky.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 11, 2020, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. This page has been viewed 91 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 11, 2020, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 7, 2021