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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Tiburon in Marin County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

The Trestle and Blackie's Pasture

The Tiburon Peninsula Historical Trail

 
 
The Trestle and Blackie's Pasture Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 11, 2020
1. The Trestle and Blackie's Pasture Marker
Inscription.  
(Left photo caption:)

The trestle, which crossed Tiburon Boulevard, was a landmark for 84 years until it was torn down in 1968, a year after the last train rumbled over its sturdy wooden framework. This picture is from the 1930s. The berm on the south end still can be seen.

(Right photo caption:)

For 28 years, you could not leave or return to Belvedere or Tiburon without passing a swaybacked horse named Blackie grazing in his pasture. Blackie was a former cavalry horse that later a cutting horse at rodeos Salinas, was used as and appeared in the California rodeo. When he was 12 years old, Blackie retired to his private pasture at the corner of Tiburon Boulevard and Trestle Glen Road. His owner, Anthony Connell, visited him daily, and people of all ages could often be seen feeding Blackie carrots, sugar and hay, until his death in 1966.

 
Erected by Tiburon Peninsula Foundation, Belvedere-Tiburon Landmarks Society. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsRailroads & Streetcars.
 
Location.

The Trestle and Blackie's Pasture Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 11, 2020
2. The Trestle and Blackie's Pasture Marker - wide view
37° 53.759′ N, 122° 29.399′ W. Marker is in Tiburon, California, in Marin County. Marker can be reached from Tiburon Boulevard. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Belvedere Tiburon CA 94920, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. History of the Tiburon Trestle (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tiburon's Railroad History (about 700 feet away); Hilarita (approx. 1.7 miles away); John Reed's Saw Mill (approx. 1.7 miles away); Reed School (approx. 1.8 miles away); China Cabin (approx. 2.2 miles away); Pacific Mail Steamship China (approx. 2.2 miles away); William Henry Webb (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tiburon.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located at the trailhead, adjacent to the parking lot for Blackie's Pasture. This is one of twelve markers situated along the trail.
 
Marker detail: Lower left photo <i>(See marker body text for caption)</i> image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the Landmarks Archives, circa 1930s
3. Marker detail: Lower left photo (See marker body text for caption)
An additional plaque for Blackie image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 11, 2020
4. An additional plaque for Blackie
Just a bit down the trail from the marker is a plaque for Blackie that reads: "Blackie, our beloved sway-backed horse stood in this pasture for 28 of his 40 years. Children honored his preference for carrots and apples. You could not pass by without looking for Blackie, and when you found him, you invariably smiled....This sculpture in bronze (see next photo) by Albert Guibara was made possible by the children of Tiburon's first mayor, Gordon Strawbridge."
Blackie, by Albert Guibara image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 11, 2020
5. Blackie, by Albert Guibara
Another plaque for Blackie image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 11, 2020
6. Another plaque for Blackie
Mounted to a rock about 200 feet from the subject marker is another plaque for Blackie, with his grave directly behind it. Note the discrepancy in birthyear - 1933 on this plaque, versus 1926 on both the subject marker and the other Blackie plaque.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 14, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 14, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 41 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 14, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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Feb. 25, 2021