Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Riverside in Riverside County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Harada House

1884

 
 
Harada House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, 2017
1. Harada House Marker
Inscription.  This house was purchased in 1915 by local restaurant proprietor Jukichi Harada in the names of his three American-born minor children. It was remodeled and expanded to two stories in 1916. The question of legal ownership of this house resulted in the first test - - and successful challenge - - of the 1913 California Alien Land Law which prohibited aliens from legally owning property in the state. Jukichi Harada died in 1944.
 
Erected 1977 by City of Riverside. (Marker Number 23.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Asian AmericansCivil RightsWar, World II. In addition, it is included in the California Historical Landmarks series list.
 
Location. 33° 59.109′ N, 117° 22.15′ W. Marker is in Riverside, California, in Riverside County. Marker is on Lemon Street north of 4th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3356 Lemon St, Riverside CA 92501, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mission Inn (approx. ¼ mile away); Mount Rubidoux
Harada House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, 2017
2. Harada House and Marker
(approx. one mile away); Lt Col Shunzo Kido (approx. 1.3 miles away); Robidoux Grist Mill Site (approx. 2.3 miles away); Highgrove Hydroelectric Plant (approx. 2½ miles away); Trujillo Adobe (approx. 2.6 miles away); Jensen-Alvarado Ranch (approx. 2.8 miles away); The First Marsh Grapefruit Trees into California (approx. 3.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Riverside.
 
Regarding Harada House. Jukichi Harada emigrated from Japan during the early 1900’s. He purchased this house in 1915 and placed ownership in the hands of his three minor children, who were natural-born United States citizens. This was because immigrants from Japan were prevented from owning property by the California Alien Land Law of 1913. After the purchase, neighboring property owners attempted to drive the Haradas out, without success. State authorities then filed suit against the children to bring it into state ownership in 1916. In 1918, Superior Court Judge Hugh Craig upheld the right of the children to own the house. In 1942 the Harada family was sent to Japanese internment camps, where both Jukichi Harada and his
National Historic Landmark Marker for the Harada House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, 2017
3. National Historic Landmark Marker for the Harada House
wife died. During their internment, a Caucasian friend of the family occupied the house, and the family was able to retain ownership. In the years after the war, Sumi Harada, one of the three children, took over the house and boarded other Japanese families who had lost their homes during their internment. The house became a City of Riverside Landmark in 1977 and a National Historic Landmark in 1990. In 2004 the house was given to the Riverside Metropolitan Museum. In 2020 it was nominated as a California Historic Landmark.
 
Harada Family in 1905 image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Riverside Metropolitan Museum
4. Harada Family in 1905
Headlines — 1916 Lawsuit image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Riverside Metropolitan Museum
5. Headlines — 1916 Lawsuit
Photo shows the house before the second floor was added.
Departure Date written on bedroom wall image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Riverside Metropolitan Museum
6. Departure Date written on bedroom wall
“Evacuated on May 23, 1942 Sat - HH” [Harold Harada]
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 16, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 14, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. This page has been viewed 294 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 14, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Feb. 28, 2021