Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Woodside in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, North Cornerstone

 
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone North Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, October 22, 2011
1. Original Federal Boundary Stone North Marker
Repainted, 2013
Inscription.  
Original Federal Boundary Stone
District of Columbia
Placed 1791-1792
Protected by Maryland Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
1916

 
Erected 1916 by Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Political Subdivisions. In addition, it is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), and the Original Federal Boundary Stones series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1916.
 
Location. 38° 59.761′ N, 77° 2.456′ W. Marker is in Woodside, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from East West Highway (Route 410) 0.3 miles west of 16th Street (Route 390), on the right when traveling east. Marker is about 50 feet south of the roadway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Silver Spring MD 20910, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. MARC Train #286 (approx. Ό mile away); Xeriscape Demonstration Project (approx. half a mile away); Ferdinand Rudolph Hassler (approx. 0.6 miles away); Indonesia Muslim Association in America (IMAAM) Center
Original Federal Boundary Stone North Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
2. Original Federal Boundary Stone North Marker
The marker is shown prior to repainting.
Click or scan to see
this page online
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Modern Banking (approx. 0.6 miles away); 24-Hour Service (approx. 0.6 miles away); Geodetic Marker (approx. 0.7 miles away); Two Roads (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Woodside.
 
More about this marker. This marker is known as the North marker, as it marks the most northern part of the District of Columbia.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. The other 3 corner boundary stones.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Boundary Stones. Washington DC Daughters of the American Revolution website entry (Submitted on February 3, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.) 

2. Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia. Website homepage (Submitted on April 3, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone North Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
3. Original Federal Boundary Stone North Marker
Most of the marker is below grade level, probably from silt draining down from higher ground.
Northeast Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
4. Northeast Side of Marker
Because this stone is in the northern corner of DC, two sides of this marker (NE and NW) face the state of Maryland.
Northwest Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
5. Northwest Side of Marker
Another of the two sides of this marker that face the state of Maryland.
Southeast Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
6. Southeast Side of Marker
This side is split between between the "Jurisdiction of the United States" and "Maryland".
Southwest Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
7. Southwest Side of Marker
This side of the marker is also split between "Maryland" and the "Jurisdiction of the United States".
North Boundary Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Fred Woodward
8. North Boundary Marker
Diagram of the inscriptions by Fred Woodward in A Ramble along the Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia,Columbia Historical Society Proceedings, 1907.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 21, 2022. It was originally submitted on February 3, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,897 times since then and 14 times this year. Last updated on August 16, 2020, by Roberto Bernate of Arlington, Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on April 13, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on February 3, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   8. submitted on April 13, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=154844

Paid Advertisements
 
 

May. 16, 2022