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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Kong Chow Association and Temple

 
 
Kong Chow Association and Temple Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 23, 2020
1. Kong Chow Association and Temple Marker
Inscription.  
On this site in 1851, Yee Ah Tye established the Sze Yup Company, one of the first Chinese mutual aid associations in America. Sze Yup Company provided mutual support, social services and economic aid. Constructed as a temple, the building served as a cultural touchstone for newly arriving Chinese. In 1867, the organization became the Kong Chow Beneficial Society and Asylum, which continues to operate to this day. The original building was destroyed by the great 1906 earthquake and fire. This rendering represents the 1908 re-built temple facade, which was designed by Chas Paff Co. and J. Baur Architects.

一八五一年,余阿大於此成立了第一家中國互助協會 1四 巳公司。 該協會旨在促進美國華人相互支持, 並報併社會與經濟援助。當時此處也是座寺廟,成為

Kong Chow Association and Temple Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 23, 2020
2. Kong Chow Association and Temple Marker - wide view
新華人文化與精神的寄托所。一八六七年四邑公司正 式更名為岡州協會及、几護所,此名稱一直沿用至今。 原址在一九零六年的地震與犬火中被摧毀。此圖為一 九零八年向查斯帕夫姿司及鮑爾建某師主導重建的設 計。


 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Asian AmericansChurches & ReligionFraternal or Sororal Organizations.
 
Location. 37° 47.504′ N, 122° 24.277′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is at the intersection of Pine Street and Kearny Street, on the right when traveling west on Pine Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Francisco CA 94108, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "Comfort Women" Column of Strength (a few steps from this marker); Chinese-American War Memorial (within

Marker illustration: Kong Chow Clan Association Building image. Click for full size.
August 23, 2020
3. Marker illustration: Kong Chow Clan Association Building
shouting distance of this marker); Dr. Sun Yat Sen (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); California Theatre (about 300 feet away); SFFD Engine Co. No. 2 (about 400 feet away); Pacific States Building (about 400 feet away); William Ingraham Kip (about 400 feet away); Site of Old St. Mary’s (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kong Chow Temple, 冈州古庙 San Francisco, USA (Chinatownlology). "In 1906, the original building was destroyed during the San Francisco earthquake. The importance of this institution was reflected in community’s efforts to rebuild it.... It is said that in 1948, Mrs. Harry Truman visited the temple to pray for Mr. Truman’s election results and asked for a prediction of 1948 election. At that time, most of the American public had expected her husband to lose the election.... Mrs. Truman held a container with prediction sticks and shook them until one of the sticks fell on the ground. This stick was exchanged for a paper slip with a story offering clues to her answer. It was an auspicious prediction and Mr. Truman did win the elections
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to become the 33rd President of the United States of America." (Submitted on August 23, 2020.) 

2. Kong Chow Temple (Wikipedia). "Kong Chow Temple (traditional Chinese: 岡州古廟; simplified Chinese: 冈州古庙...) is a temple dedicated to Guan Di, located in the Chinatown neighborhood of San Francisco, California, in the United States....The temple was founded, in 1849, by members of the Cantonese population of San Francisco. In 1854, the temple was renamed Kong Chow Clan Association, to stress the social activities planned by the temple. The Association provided social welfare and religious needs for the community. Like many buildings in the area, it was destroyed in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and the community worked together to rebuild it at its original location, 520 Pine, near St. Mary's Square...." (Submitted on August 23, 2020.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 12, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 23, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 56 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 23, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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Mar. 1, 2021