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Corinth in Alcorn County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

“All of our trains are ordered to Corinth…”

- R.B. Lewis, Superintendent, New Orleans, Jackson, & Great Northern Railroad, March 1862

 
 
“All of our trains are ordered to Corinth…” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
1. “All of our trains are ordered to Corinth…” Marker
Inscription.  The famous long distance railroads intersecting in Corinth in 1862 formed two links in a shaky network of rails crisscrossing Mississippi and her neighboring states. This network proved critical when General Albert Sidney Johnston began concentrating Confederate forces at Corinth from all over the mid-south. A section of particular importance was the New Orleans, Jackson, & Great Northern Railroad. Completed in 1858, the 206-mile-long line stretched from New Orleans to Canton, Mississippi. In the build-up of troops prior to the Battle of Shiloh, nine regiments and three battalions of infantry, as well as four artillery batteries, were dispatched by rail from New Orleans to assist General Johnston.

Travel on the New Orleans, Jackson, & Great Northern Railroad was not without danger. On the foggy night of February 27, 1862, a train carrying the 7th Mississippi Infantry left New Orleans en-route to Corinth. At 4 o’clock in the morning, the troop train collided head-on with a lumber train near Ponchatoula, Louisiana, killing eighteen sleeping soldiers instantly, and injuring dozens of others, several fatally.

The Federal capture
“All of our trains are ordered to Corinth…” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
2. “All of our trains are ordered to Corinth…” Marker
Marker located on the left.
of New Orleans, and a year later Jackson, limited the use of the NOJ&GN Railroad. As the war progressed, the line became a repeated target of United States troops. Frequent raids by cavalry and infantry, including troops under General William T. Sherman, often brought travel to a complete halt for months at a time. On July 18,1863, a Union cavalry raid inflicted so much damage on the line, a year was required to repair it all.

This piece of iron rail dating to the Civil War period was found in Jackson, Mississippi, close to the Pearl River.

(captions)
The “Gen. Haupt” of the U.S. Military Railroads, was a 4x4x0 locomotive, the same type used on the NO, J & GN.

One dollar railroad script for the New Orleans, Jackson, & Great Northern Railroad.

Virginia. Tracks of the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, destroyed by the Confederates between Bristow Station and the Rappahannock. Library of Congress.

Atlanta, Georgia. Sherman’s men destroying railroad. Library of Congress.

A map of the NO, J & GN showing the different stops along the route.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 34° 56.303′ N, 88° 31.248′ W. Marker is
Tracks of the O&A RR, destroyed by the Confederates between Bristow Station and the Rappahannock image. Click for full size.
By Timothy H. O'Sullivan, October 1863
3. Tracks of the O&A RR, destroyed by the Confederates between Bristow Station and the Rappahannock
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-cwpb-00768]
in Corinth, Mississippi, in Alcorn County. Marker is at the intersection of Polk Street and East Linden Street, on the right when traveling north on Polk Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Corinth MS 38834, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Historic Corinth Railroad Junction (here, next to this marker); “A fearful hand-to-hand fight (here, next to this marker); War in a Railroad Town (here, next to this marker); Raining death and destruction from afar… (here, next to this marker); First Steps Toward Citizenship for a Newly Free People (here, next to this marker); “I was in the battle of Shiloh (here, next to this marker); Staff Officers (here, next to this marker); Strategic Importance of Corinth (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Corinth.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern. Wikipedia (Submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.) 

2. New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern. Confederate Railroads (Submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.) 
 
Atlanta, Georgia. Sherman's men destroying railroad image. Click for full size.
By George N. Barnard, 1864
4. Atlanta, Georgia. Sherman's men destroying railroad
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-cwpb-03394]
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 60 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.   3, 4. submitted on August 27, 2020. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 6, 2021