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Corinth in Alcorn County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Raining death and destruction from afar…

 
 
Raining death and destruction from afar… Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
1. Raining death and destruction from afar… Marker
Inscription.  This now deactivated artillery round was recovered from the western side of the October 1862 Corinth battlefield. Called spherical case, this hollow projectile contained a small bursting charge of gunpowder, surrounded by 450 balls, each of .69 caliber. Armed with a timed fuse, this shell was designed to explode over a large concentration of troops, showering down many small but destructive bullets on the enemy. A four-pound charge of gunpowder could hurl this round over a mile. Fuse reliability was a concern; shells failing to detonate would burrow into the earth, causing little harm.

This massive cannon ball, one of the heaviest used in the two-day battle, would have been fired from an 8-inch siege howitzer. Union forces had four such fearsome weapons, posted withing Batteries Madison, Phillips, and Williams. (No less than 169 pieces of artillery of several different types and calibers saw action during the Battle of Corinth).

On October 4, 1862, gunners in Battery Madison began to fire in this direction, to blunt a Confederate breakthrough. Private George Jenkins of Battery B, 2nd Illinois Light Artillery wrote, “We
Raining death and destruction from afar… Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
2. Raining death and destruction from afar… Marker
Marker is located on the right.
wheeled our old bull dogs from battery and just as the Rebels were entering town, our old sixty-fours began to drop among them and mow them down like grass.”

However, unable to accurately aim through the thick clouds of smoke, the Illinois gunners’ lethal rounds also began to explode over the Union infantrymen of the 2nd Division, killing many. Brigadier General Thomas Davies reported how one o these large balls grazed a staff officer at his side before “taking off the legs of two of my brave soldiers directly in his front”.

“I sent two orderlies in succession to the commander of this battery, begging him to reserve his fire for the enemy.”
– Brig Gen. Thomas Davies, Commander 3rd Division

(captions)
Highlight of “Plan of the Battle of Corinth.”

An 8” Siege Howitzer at Seven Pines, VA. Library of Congress.

A Model 1841, 8” Siege Howitzer. Shiloh National Military Park
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 34° 56.303′ N, 88° 31.247′ W. Marker is in Corinth, Mississippi, in Alcorn County. Marker is at the intersection of Polk Street and East Linden Street, on the right when traveling north on Polk Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Corinth MS 38834, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8
Gen. Thomas Davies, U.S.A. image. Click for full size.
3. Gen. Thomas Davies, U.S.A.
other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Steps Toward Citizenship for a Newly Free People (here, next to this marker); War in a Railroad Town (here, next to this marker); The Historic Corinth Railroad Junction (here, next to this marker); “All of our trains are ordered to Corinth…” (here, next to this marker); “A fearful hand-to-hand fight (here, next to this marker); Staff Officers (here, next to this marker); “I was in the battle of Shiloh (here, next to this marker); Strategic Importance of Corinth (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Corinth.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Seven Pines, Va. Twin houses on battlefield, with 32-pdr. field howitzer in foreground image. Click for full size.
By George N. Barnard, 1862
4. Seven Pines, Va. Twin houses on battlefield, with 32-pdr. field howitzer in foreground
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-cwpb-01046]
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 53 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.   4. submitted on August 27, 2020. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021