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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Cherokee in San Saba County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Site of Old Behrns West Texas Normal and Business College

 
 
Site of Old Behrns West Texas Normal and Business College Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, August 7, 2020
1. Site of Old Behrns West Texas Normal and Business College Marker
Inscription.  ​

Opened 1895 by noted educator Francis Marion Behrns. A 3-story native blue marble main hall and frame dormitory were built by interested local citizens.

Courses included mathematics, natural sciences, Latin, oratory, commercial subjects, literature, psychology, music and painting. Character building was stressed. Its graduates led in teaching and other professions. 

After the Behrns School closed in 1903, buildings were used by Cherokee Junior College; after 1921 by public schools. In 1945 fire destroyed old main hall.
 
Erected 1966 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 4846.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Education.
 
Location. 30° 58.743′ N, 98° 42.494′ W. Marker is in Cherokee, Texas, in San Saba County. Marker is on State Highway 16 near Momax Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cherokee TX 76832, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Baby Head Cemetery (approx.
Marker and Old Bell image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, August 7, 2020
2. Marker and Old Bell
7.1 miles away); Community of Valley Spring (approx. 10.7 miles away); McAnelly Settlement (approx. 15.2 miles away).
 
Part of the old school image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, August 7, 2020
3. Part of the old school
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 1, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 31, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 31, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 5, 2021