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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Cordova in Talbot County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage

 
 
Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
1. Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker
Inscription.  At age six, Frederick Bailey was forced to leave the Tuckahoe and enter terrifying plantation life under his master's roof in Miles River Neck. He witnessed brutal and routine violence against enslaved people. Later, in Baltimore, he gleaned literacy from the streets, sharpened his intellect, and became empowered through his newfound religion.

After his master moved him to St. Michaels as a teenager, Frederick started a clandestine Sunday School, teaching others to read. When discovered, he was dispatched to the fields of "slavebreaker" Edward Covey, whom he famously fought and beat. From Covey's isolated Bayside shore, Frederick gained inspiration to self-emancipate from the white sails on the Chesapeake Bay.

'"You are loosed from your moorings, and are free; I am fast in my chains, and am a slave! You move merrily before the gentle gale, and I sadly before the bloody whip!
Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom, 1855

During the first 1 years of his life, Frederick Douglass lived enslaved in several waterside places on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Waterways were the highways of the day. From his earliest days on the Tuckahoe

Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
2. Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker
Miles River Neck was the home of Frederick Douglass's master, Captain Aaron Anthony, overseer of overseers for Edward Lloyd. As a boy, Douglass lived in the kitchen wind and played at the nearby windmill.
Creek to his time of despair by the broad Chesapeake Bay where he resolved to be free, Douglass understood that land was the place of bondage, and water was the pathway to freedom.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Abolition & Underground RRAfrican Americans.
 
Location. 38° 54.676′ N, 75° 57.001′ W. Marker is near Cordova, Maryland, in Talbot County. Marker can be reached from Maryland Route 303, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cordova MD 21625, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Beloved Tuckahoe Home of Frederick Douglass (here, next to this marker); A Champion for Equality (here, next to this marker); Honoring an American Hero (within shouting distance of this marker); Frederick Douglass (approx. half a mile away); St. Paul’s Episcopal Church (approx. half a mile away); Adkins Arboretum (approx. 3.1 miles away); St. Joseph’s Church (approx. 3.6 miles away); Tuckahoe Neck Meeting House (approx. 5.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cordova.
 
Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
3. Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker
Frederick Douglass keenly observed the world around him.
"The windmill...was to me a source of infinite interest and pleasure...to view the whirling winds of his wondrous machine. From the mill we could see other objects of deep interest. These were, the vessels from St. Michael's, on their way to Baltimore. It was a source of jmuch amusement to view the flowing sails and complicated rigging."
Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom, 1855
Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
4. Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker
A log canoe, like the one shown in this photo, is the type Frederick Douglass planned to paddle and sail to freedom. Learn about these boats and visit the home of Douglass's sister, Eliza Bailey Mitchell, at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels.
Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
5. Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage Marker
Frederick Douglass returned to Easton in 178 as a world-renowned orator, author and statesman.He delivered an address aththe Talbot County Courthouse, adjacent to the jail site where he was held for a harrowing week in 236 for planning to claim his freedom. A statue erected outside the courthouse in 2011 commemorates the address and Douglass's legacy.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 4, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 4, 2020, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 61 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 4, 2020, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.
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Feb. 28, 2021