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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Alameda in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

History of the Alameda Belt Line

 
 
History of the Alameda Belt Line Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 29, 2020
1. History of the Alameda Belt Line Marker
Inscription.  In 1918, the City of Alameda invested some of the profits from its Municipal Lighting Plant in a railroad. The "belt line,” so called because it traveled around, rather than into a city, ran 1.16 miles along Clement Avenue from Pearl Street to Grand Street. It served the industrial zone that the City had recently created on its north shore along the Oakland Estuary. The railroad's customers included Dow Pump & Diesel Engine Company and the newly minted Barnes & Tibbitts Shipyard.

In 1924 the City Council voted to extend the railroad to Sherman Street in order to serve the California Packing Corporation's Del Monte warehouse and the Alaska Packers Association. On December 15 of that same year, the City sold its railroad to the Western Pacific Railroad and the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway for $30,000. Less than a month later, the new owners incorporated as the Alameda Belt Line (ABL). By the end of 1928, ABL had added 5.6 miles of tracks, including in the railroad yard that is now Jean Sweeney Open Space Park.

ABL served Alameda's north shore for seventy years, closing on November 10, 1998. The Union Pacific

History of the Alameda Belt Line Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 29, 2020
2. History of the Alameda Belt Line Marker - wide view
Railroad continued to run its trains along Clement Avenue for two more years to accommodate Pennzoil-Quaker State.

Credit: Dennis Evanosky, Alameda Museum
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Railroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 37° 46.748′ N, 122° 15.907′ W. Marker is in Alameda, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from Atlantic Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Alameda CA 94501, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jean Sweeney - Alameda's "Little Engine That Could" (within shouting distance of this marker); 930 Pacific Avenue (approx. 0.3 miles away); Skippy Peanut Butter (approx. 0.6 miles away); First Transcontinental Railroad (approx. 0.7 miles away); 1930 Where the World Comes to Oakland (approx. 0.7 miles away); The History of the Site of the Shade Tree (approx. ¾ mile away); 1920 Moving the World's Cargo (approx. ¾ mile away); U.S. Maritime Officers Memorial (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alameda.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located within the Jean Sweeney Open Space Park, a bit south and west of the parking lot.
 
Also see . . .  Alameda Belt Line (Wikipedia). (Submitted on September 29, 2020.)

 
Original Alameda Belt Line Train Waiting Station image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 29, 2020
3. Original Alameda Belt Line Train Waiting Station
This station is about a 2 minute walk to the west/northwest from the marker.
Marker inset: Diesel Locomotive image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of Gary Lenhart, Alemedainfo.org
4. Marker inset: Diesel Locomotive
"The American Locomotive Company built this diesel locomotive for the Alameda Belt Line in 1942. The Central California Traction Company (CCT) in Stockton acquired it in 1963. CCT sold it for parts to the Stockton Terminal and Eastern Railroad in 1976."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 29, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 65 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 29, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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Mar. 8, 2021