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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Tacoma in Pierce County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Job Carr's Cabin

"Birthplace of Tacoma"

 
 
Job Carr's Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 25, 2016
1. Job Carr's Cabin Marker
Inscription.  
Job Carr, a recently discharged Union war veteran, came to Commencement Bay in 1864. In the winter of 1864-65 he began clearing land for a small log cabin near today's North 30th and McCarver in an area now called Old Town Tacoma. By 1869 Job Carr's preemption claim was platted as Tacoma City and had expanded to include a school, hotel, lumber mill and other businesses. During this period Job Carr's cabin served as the first Tacoma post office and polling place where he served as postmaster. In 1874 Carr became Tacoma's first Mayor.

This replica of Job Carr's log cabin is an important memorial to the present-day City of Tacoma. A small village grew around the original cabin and gradually developed into one of Puget Sound's thriving ports. For many years, Carr's cabin served as the community center and sheltered many travelers and distinguished guests. Indeed Carr's cabin was Tacoma during its earliest years.
 
Erected by Metro Parks Tacoma, City of Tacoma, Job Carr's Cabin in Old Tacoma Executive Council.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists:

Job Carr's Cabin Marker - wide view, with the Job Carr Cabin Museum in the background image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 25, 2016
2. Job Carr's Cabin Marker - wide view, with the Job Carr Cabin Museum in the background
Notable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 47° 16.479′ N, 122° 28.097′ W. Marker is in Tacoma, Washington, in Pierce County. Marker is on North 30th Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2350 North 30th Street, Tacoma WA 98403, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Community Life in Old Tacoma (a few steps from this marker); Our First Settlers (a few steps from this marker); Tacoma City (a few steps from this marker); Building the Cabin (a few steps from this marker); Ester Allstrum (within shouting distance of this marker); The Job Carr Family (within shouting distance of this marker); Coming of the Railroad to Tacoma (within shouting distance of this marker); Emma Smith Devoe (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tacoma.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located in Old Town Park, a little to the east of the cabin (the Job Carr Cabin Museum) itself.
 
Also see . . .  Job Carr Cabin Museum: An Oral History (Job Carr Museum). (Submitted on October 9, 2020.)
 
Job Carr's Cabin Museum image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 25, 2016
3. Job Carr's Cabin Museum
Job Carr's Cabin Museum Dedication Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 25, 2016
4. Job Carr's Cabin Museum Dedication Plaque
Located out in front of the cabin.
Marker inset: Job Carr image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the Job Carr Family Collection
5. Marker inset: Job Carr
<i>Job Carr cabin, Point Defiance Park, Tacoma, Washington, ca. 1919</i> image. Click for full size.
Albert Henry Barnes (courtesy of the University of Washington), circa 1919
6. Job Carr cabin, Point Defiance Park, Tacoma, Washington, ca. 1919
"Built in 1865, it was disassembled and reconstructed in the park in 1918. On sleeve of negative: Oldest log cabin in NW at Pt. Defiance Park".
The cabin actually had two different locations in the park. Due to its poor condition, it was dissembled in 1988, and its constituent pieces were deemed unsuitable for constructing the replica cabin that is now the Job Carr Cabin Museum.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 9, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 9, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 40 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 9, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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Jan. 21, 2021