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Ticonderoga in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Crossroads of a Community

LaChute Riverwalk

 
 
Crossroads of a Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, September 12, 2020
1. Crossroads of a Community Marker
Inscription.  
From the time of the first land survey of the lower falls in 1822, a bridge has crossed LaChute River here, where Spencer Creek once rejoined the main stream. Eventually, the bridge took its name from the planing mill run by B.F. Frazier on the other side of the River starting in 1836. A cast-iron "Cooper patent” arched-truss bridge with a plank deck replaced the old wood bridge in 1874. When it collapsed in 1892, a petition circulated in support of building a stone arch bridge, arguing that the savings on replacement plank decking would soon offset the additional construction cost.

The present Frazier Bridge owes its survival to the reorganization of traffic brought on by the expansion of the International Paper Company complex. The bridge carried Main Street across the River until 1960, when construction of an immense building for the "Number 7 paper machine” blocked the road. A new road, Tower Avenue, became the main crossing while Main Street reverted to a footpath between the mill buildings.

Top Left Photo: This wayside exhibit stands on the site of the Island Mill Power Station where water
Crossroads of a Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, September 12, 2020
2. Crossroads of a Community Marker
piped from the "upper dam” drove hydroelectric generators. Water from the electric generators, as well as the water from the pulp vats and paper machines, flowed back into the River here.

Top Center Photo: Benjamin Franklin Frazier lived between the bridge and his furniture shop. He also worked as an undertaker, building coffins from the lumber planed at his mill (in rear). Portions of this shop still survive inside the building across the River.

Top Right DrawingThe map of Ticonderoga published in 1876 shows the original path of the River, with Spencer Creek breaking off above Exchange Street (now Montcalm Street) and rejoining the River just above the bridge. Three short years later, the first pulp mill would start an industrial revolution that would transform this landscape many times over.

Main Picture: Sir Henry Barnard's sketch of “Ticonderoga Creek” shows the simple wooden bridge, just beyond Spencer Creek, entering on the right. Note the pile of boards issuing from Frazier's Planing Mill on the left, as well as the strolling couple and the woman washing clothes on the riverbank.

All images courtesy of the Ticonderoga Historical Society
 
Erected by Lake Champlain Basin Program. (Marker Number 4.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is
Crossroads of a Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, September 12, 2020
3. Crossroads of a Community Marker
listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 43° 51.011′ N, 73° 25.338′ W. Marker is in Ticonderoga, New York, in Essex County. Marker can be reached from Adirondack Park north of Champlain Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ticonderoga NY 12883, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Island Mill (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tower Avenue Grindstones (about 400 feet away); 1756 French Saw Mill on La Chute River (about 500 feet away); Rivière de La Chute (about 500 feet away); Anatomy of the River (about 500 feet away); Lakes to Locks Passage (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Lakes to Locks Passage (about 600 feet away); Hon. Clayton Harris DeLano (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ticonderoga.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 18, 2020, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 18, 2020, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 19, 2021