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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Dallas in Dallas County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

William Sidney Pittman

 
 
William Sidney Pittman Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 22, 2020
1. William Sidney Pittman Marker
Inscription.  

Pioneer African American architect William Sidney Pittman was born in Montgomery, Alabama on April 21, 1875. Pittman attended segregated public schools in Montgomery and Birmingham before enrolling at the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama in 1892 at the age of 17. In 1897, Pittman entered the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry and graduated in 1900 with a focus on architecture and mechanical drawing. For a short time, Pittman worked at the Tuskegee Institute and then moved to Washington, D.C. to open a private architectural practice. During this time, he designed numerous public buildings and gained recognition as one of the most accomplished black architects in America. In 1907, he married Portia Washington, daughter of Booker T. Washington, founder of the Tuskegee Institute, and in 1913, they moved to Dallas where Pittman operated an office from their home.

While in Dallas, Pittman designed many buildings, including the 1916 Pythian Temple, built to serve as the state headquarters for the black fraternal organization, the Knights of Pythias. The building was financed by the black citizens
William Sidney Pittman Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 22, 2020
2. William Sidney Pittman Marker
of Dallas and served as the social gathering place for the community. Pittman also designed St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church in Dallas, Joshua Chapel A.M.E. Church in Waxahachie and Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church in Fort Worth, along with other buildings. Pittman designed dozens of buildings in the U.S., including 14 known works in Texas. He also published the newspaper Brotherhood Eyes. He died in 1958 and was buried at Glen Oaks (later Pinkston) Cemetery. Pittman is remembered as the first practicing African American architect in Texas and still serves as an inspiration to future generations.
 
Erected 2008 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16122.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansArchitectureChurches & ReligionIndustry & Commerce.
 
Location. 32° 47.222′ N, 96° 47.382′ W. Marker is in Dallas, Texas, in Dallas County. Marker is on North Good Latimer Expressway, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 624 N Good Latimer Expressway, Dallas TX 75204, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wilson Block (approx. ¼ mile away); Original Site of the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Dallas (approx. 0.3 miles away); Karl St. John Hoblitzelle
William Sidney Pittman image. Click for full size.
3. William Sidney Pittman
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Majestic Theatre (approx. 0.4 miles away); Hilton Hotel (approx. 0.4 miles away); Moorland YMCA Building (approx. half a mile away); Baylor College of Dentistry (approx. half a mile away); The Dallas Morning News (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dallas.
 
St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 22, 2020
4. St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church
St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 22, 2020
5. St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church
St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 22, 2020
6. St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church cornerstone
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 23, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 23, 2020, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. This page has been viewed 31 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 23, 2020, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 6, 2021