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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Cascade Locks in Hood River County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

the Oregon Pony

 
 
the Oregon Pony Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 13, 2020
1. the Oregon Pony Marker
Inscription.   "The first locomotive ever run over the first railroad ever built in the state of Oregon"

Early travel on the Oregon Trail was extremely dangerous. The last 100 miles of the journey westward from The Dalles to the Willamette Valley included a difficult raft trip on the Columbia River. Treacherous rapids, shifting sandbars and shear basalt cliffs ended the journey for many pioneers when they approached the Cascades, known today as Cascade Locks.
Early passage at the Cascades was provided by a short portage railroad: Mule-drawn portage cars hauled freight up the steep incline that bypassed the treacherous rapids.
When the Washington portage, located on the north side of the Columbia River, announced plans to upgrade to a steam railroad, the Oregon portage ordered a steam locomotive from the Vulcan Foundary (sic) in San Francisco. On April 25, 1862, the "Oregon Pony," the first steam engine in the Northwest, began operation. This locomotive was nicknamed the "Pony" because it replaced the mules that pulled the old portage cars.
In 1863, the Pony was moved to The Dalles for use on the Celilo portage.
the Oregon Pony Marker and Locomotive Building image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 13, 2020
2. the Oregon Pony Marker and Locomotive Building
Three years later the Pony was sent to San Francisco where it was used for leveling sand hills.
In 1905, after sustaining fire damage, the Oregon Pony was restored, at a cost of $2,000, and returned to Cascade Locks in 1970, on loan from the Oregon Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Railroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 45° 40.104′ N, 121° 53.727′ W. Marker is in Cascade Locks, Oregon, in Hood River County. Marker can be reached from 45.668399, -121.895455 near Wa Na Pa Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 417 45668399, -121895455, Cascade Locks OR 97014, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cascade Falls Portage (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Bridge of the Gods (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Bridge of the Gods (approx. half a mile away in Washington); Lewis and Clark Trail (approx. 1.2 miles away in Washington); Gatekeepers of the Columbia (approx. 1.2 miles away in Washington); "The Great Shoote" (approx. 1.7 miles away in Washington); Steamboats Docked at Stevenson (approx. 1.7 miles away in Washington); Great Depression Threatens Bank (approx. 1.8 miles away in Washington). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cascade Locks.
 
The Oregon Pony image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 13, 2020
3. The Oregon Pony
The First
Oregon Locomotive
Present By
David Hews
of San Francisco Cal.
to the State of Oregon as a souvenir indicative of its early commerce as developed by the
Oregon Steamship Navigation Co.
The Oregon Pony image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 13, 2020
4. The Oregon Pony
The Oregon Pony image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 13, 2020
5. The Oregon Pony
The Oregon Pony image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 13, 2020
6. The Oregon Pony
First Locomotive in the Pacific Northwest
This engine was operated in (?) 1852 and 1863 freight and passenger service on the line (?) first Oregon railroad on the southern bank of the Columbia River between Bonneville and Cascade Locks
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 24, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 24, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 26 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 24, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Mar. 7, 2021