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Matagorda in Matagorda County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Matagorda Incident

 
 
The Matagorda Incident Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 11, 2020
1. The Matagorda Incident Marker
Inscription.  

Late in 1863, during the Civil War, Union forces stormed much of the Texas coast in an effort to block the flow of goods and supplies going through coastal ports. One of the most important port openings was in Matagorda Bay where the Gulf of Mexico meets the Colorado River. The Bay is shielded by a strip of land, the Matagorda Peninsula. In December of that year, Union soldiers were reported to have landed on Matagorda Peninsula supported by union gunboats. The present Confederate Naval Officer, Capt. James R. Marmion, led gunboats to face the union ships across the peninsula.

On the morning of December 30, 1863, Confederate Cavalry and the Union landing party opened fire. Capt. Marmion's gunboats helped to prevent the Union forces from successfully constructing fortifications. One Union ship left to gather reinforcements, while Capt. Marmion realized that he too needed more men to support the cavalry Capt. Edward S. Rugeley and his company D of Brown's Regiment, Texas Cavalry, were originally stationed to defend the town of Matagorda, but that afternoon Capt. Marmion called upon them to report to his gunboat to stage an amphibious
The Matagorda Incident Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 11, 2020
2. The Matagorda Incident Marker
assault. That night a combined total of 57 men took two boats to the shore of the peninsula as well as a third boat to carry officers. An extremely cold norther forced Capt. Rugeley to call the transports to return to the gunboat. Despite the short distance to retreat, the boats were swamped in the storm and 22 men died. Most Matagorda families were impacted by the deaths. Eventually the Union troops retreated, leaving the Confederate forces in control of the peninsula.
Marker is property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18122.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 28° 42.087′ N, 95° 57.384′ W. Marker is in Matagorda, Texas, in Matagorda County. Marker is on Matagorda Cemetery Road 0.1 miles south of State Highway 60, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Matagorda TX 77457, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Burials in Matagorda Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Graves of Unknown Matagorda Settlers (within shouting distance of this marker); Matagorda Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1862 (within shouting
The Matagorda Incident Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 11, 2020
3. The Matagorda Incident Marker
distance of this marker); a different marker also named Matagorda Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hannah Carr (about 300 feet away); Albert Clinton Horton (about 500 feet away); S. Rhoads Fisher (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Matagorda.
 
Also see . . .  The Matagorda Incident, December 28-30, 1863. Reddit Texas History (Submitted on October 25, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 25, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 24, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on October 24, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.   2, 3. submitted on October 25, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 26, 2021