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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Orleans in Barnstable County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Orleans’ First Resident?

How Did Orleans Get Its Name?

 
 
Orleans’ First Resident? How Did Orleans Get Its Name? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 6, 2020
1. Orleans’ First Resident? How Did Orleans Get Its Name? Marker
Inscription.  
Orleans’ First Resident?
Strictly speaking, each of the nearly 1000 persons residing in Orleans at the time of the incorporating act were among the first residents of Orleans. But did they have a predecessor? The historical record indicates that Governor Prence and others of the first seven families established their homesteads within the boundaries of what remained Eastham. Nicholas Snow was the first to establish a homestead at Namskaket, in what is now Orleans. Nicholas Snow arrived in Plymouth on the Ann in 1623, and married Constance Hopkins, daughter of Mayflower passenger Stephen Hopkins. After relocating to Nauset/Eastham, he held the positions of surveyor, deputy, tax collector, constable, and selectman while their. He died in 1676, well before the separation, but can we claim him as our honorary first citizen?

How Did Orleans Get Its Name?
The fact that our town has a French name may seem like an oddity today, as most of the other Cape Cod towns are named after counterparts in England. However, it’s not surprising , given the context of the times, that the name
Orleans’ First Resident? How Did Orleans Get Its Name? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 6, 2020
2. Orleans’ First Resident? How Did Orleans Get Its Name? Marker
( center panel )
Orleans was chosen.
In 1797, a pro-French sentiment was very strong in the new United States both in gratitude for French assistance during the revolutionary War, and in admiration for the pro-liberty struggles that were occurring in France at the time. Revolutionary War patriot Isaac Snow had been captured twice by the British during the War and was sent to England where he was confined to prison. He managed to escape twice, and at one point made his way to France, where while waiting to return to America, likely became aware of the highly popular Louis Philippe Joseph, duc d’Orleans (Duke of Orleans). At the time, Orleans was a 30 year old naval officer, cousin of the King, and one of the wealthiest men in France. He was then a remained a strong proponent for the cause of liberty. It is said that it was Isaac Snow’s suggestion that prompted the local committee and the State Legislature to name the newly incorporated town in honor of the Duke of Orleans.
This display was made possible through Orleans Community Preservation Funds

 
Erected by Orleans Community Preservation Committee.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Events.
 
Location. 41° 47.159′ N, 69° 59.327′ W. Marker
Photo Insert: Isaac Snow image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 6, 2020
3. Photo Insert: Isaac Snow
is in Orleans, Massachusetts, in Barnstable County. Marker is on Main Street west of S. Orleans Road (Massachusetts Route 28), on the right when traveling east. Located in front of Snow Library. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 67 Main Street, Orleans MA 02653, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Incorporation of Orleans (here, next to this marker); Origins of Orleans (here, next to this marker); Orleans Korean War and Vietnam War Memorial (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Academy Place (about 400 feet away); Orleans War Memorial (about 400 feet away); Orleans Honor Roll (about 500 feet away); The French Transatlantic Telegraph Cable, 1898 (about 700 feet away); French–Atlantic Cable Company (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Orleans.
 
Historic Snow Library image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 6, 2020
4. Historic Snow Library
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 31, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 29, 2020, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 30 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 29, 2020, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 26, 2021