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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Orleans in Barnstable County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Incorporation of Orleans

 
 
The Incorporation of Orleans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 6, 2020
1. The Incorporation of Orleans Marker
Inscription.  
The Incorporation of Orleans
The Town of Orleans was born in 1797. On March 1, both houses of the Massachusetts legislature passed, and on March 3 Governor Samuel Adams signed “An act to divide the town of Eastham in the County of Barnstable and to incorporate the Southerly part thereof into a town by the name of Orleans.” The division of the towns resulted from long standing differences in interests and demographics, and there is evidence that the South Precinct had been operating somewhat independently since about 1717. Most of the population of Eastham resided in the South Precinct, and at the time of the division, only one of the three selectmen, Joseph Pepper, resided in the northern portion of town. Selectmen Hezekiah Higgins and Heman Linnell both resided in what became Orleans, At the time of separation, the population of Eastham was about 475, while the population of Orleans was more than double that. Historical evidence suggests that both entities petitioned the state legislature in support of the separation.
The March 3 Act of Incorporation authorized Isaac Sparrow, justice of the peace
The Incorporation of Orleans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 6, 2020
2. The Incorporation of Orleans Marker
( right panel )
of Eastham, to issue his warrant to a “principal inhabitant” of the new town for its first town meeting, and Selectman Higgins was selected. This meeting was held on March 16, where organizational issues were settled and the new town began to conduct routine business. Hezekiah Higgins and Heman Linnell from the old Eastham Board of Selectmen, along with Judah Rogers, became the first Selectmen in the new town. Among the first items of business was the appointment of ten fish wardens for the protection of the town waters from encroachment by other towns. The town was also divided into three districts, with the construction of a school house in each district, the appropriation of $333.33 for support of the schools, $300 for support of the Gospel, and $366 for the support of the poor. The new town of Orleans was quickly in business for itself.
This display was made possible through Orleans Community Preservation Funds

 
Erected by Orleans Community Preservation Committee.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Events.
 
Location. 41° 47.159′ N, 69° 59.325′ W. Marker is in Orleans, Massachusetts, in Barnstable County. Marker is on Main Street near S. Orleans Road (Massachusetts
Historic Snow Library image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 6, 2020
3. Historic Snow Library
Route 28), on the right when traveling east. Located in front of Snow Library. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 67 Main Street, Orleans MA 02653, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Orleans’ First Resident? (here, next to this marker); Origins of Orleans (here, next to this marker); Orleans Korean War and Vietnam War Memorial (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Academy Place (about 400 feet away); Orleans War Memorial (about 400 feet away); Orleans Honor Roll (about 500 feet away); The French Transatlantic Telegraph Cable, 1898 (about 700 feet away); French–Atlantic Cable Company (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Orleans.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 31, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 29, 2020, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 27 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 29, 2020, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 25, 2021