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Camp Verde in Yavapai County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Site of Married Officers’ Quarters

Fort Verde, Arizona Territory

 
 
Site of Married Officers’ Quarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, October 21, 2020
1. Site of Married Officers’ Quarters Marker
Inscription.  

The foundation before you is from one of two Married Officers Quarters. This two-story building was architecturally identical to the Commanding Officers Quarters, but with a reversed floor plan.

After the U.S. Army abandoned the fort, the building (pictured left) was purchased for $25 and was converted into a one-story barn in 1910. The owner made modifications to the structure. Later, the building started to collapse after a foot of snow caused the roof to cave in. In the 1930s, the building was torn down.

Originally, there were twenty-two buildings at Fort Verde four remain today. The buildings were constructed by enlisted men with the assistance of civilian masons, carpenters, and engineers. Adobe was made by Mexican civilians, and occasionally convict labor was used from Fort Whipple. First floors were made of lime plastered adobe whereas second floors were constructed with lath and lime plaster.
 
Erected by National Park Service Fort Verde.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesWars, US Indian.
 
Location.
Site of Married Officers’ Quarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, October 21, 2020
2. Site of Married Officers’ Quarters Marker
34° 33.933′ N, 111° 51.143′ W. Marker is in Camp Verde, Arizona, in Yavapai County. Marker can be reached from E Hollamon St when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 125 E Hollamon St, Camp Verde AZ 86322, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Surgeon’s Quarters (a few steps from this marker); Flagpole & Administration Building (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Site of Married Officers' Quarters (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Officers’ Row (about 400 feet away); Fort Verde State Historic Park (about 500 feet away); "0" Mile Post General Crook Trail (about 500 feet away); The Congressional Medal of Honor - Apache Campaign 1872 - 1873 (about 500 feet away); Wales Arnold (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Camp Verde.
 
Site of Married Officers’ Quarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, October 21, 2020
3. Site of Married Officers’ Quarters Marker
This photograph features the Married Officers’ Quarters building circa 1895, a few years after the military abandoned Fort Verde. The original photograph only identifies Charles A. H. Leys (left, on horse with rifle).
Site of Married Officers’ Quarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, October 21, 2020
4. Site of Married Officers’ Quarters Marker
Snow blankets Officers' Row in 1898. At the time, Fort Verde had been abandoned by the Department of the Interior and was about to go up for public action.
Site of Married Officers’ Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, October 21, 2020
5. Site of Married Officers’ Quarters
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 26, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 1, 2020, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 37 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 1, 2020, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A readable close-up photo of the marker. • Can you help?
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Feb. 25, 2021