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Montrose in Montrose County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Instrument of Surrender

The End of the Second World War

 
 
Instrument of Surrender Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 12, 2020
1. Instrument of Surrender Markers
Inscription.  

Instrument of Surrender
[not transcribed]

The End of the Second World War

After 1364 days, 5 hours and 14 minutes, World War II, Pacific, ended officially at 0904 September 2, 1945 with the signing of this Instrument of Surrender on the battleship USS Missouri, anchored in Tokyo Bay. This is an exact copy of that document, which ended the costliest war in history.

On board to sign and/or observe the signing were representatives of the allied nations. Signing on behalf of the Japanese were Foreign Ministers Mamoru Shigemitsu who signed on behalf of the Emperor of Japan (top right signature) and General Yoshijiro Umezu, who signed on behalf of Imperial General Headquarters (lower top right signature). The ceremony was conducted by General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander. Signing for the United States was Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN, Commander-in-Chief, Pacific and Pacific Ocean Areas. The signatures below his are as follows: General Hsu Yung-Chang (China), Admiral Sir Bruce Fraser (United Kingdom), Lt. General Derevyanko (Soviet Union), General Sir Thomas Blamey (Australia),

The End of the Second World War Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 12, 2020
2. The End of the Second World War Marker
Colonel Moore Cosgrove (Canada), General Jacques Le Clerk (France), Admiral C.E.I. Helfrich (the Netherlands) and Air Marshal Isitt (New Zealand).

General MacArthur stated the purpose of the occasion and an expression of hope for the future. "It is my earnest hope - indeed the hope of all mankind - that from this solemn occasion a better world shall emerge out of the blood and carnage of the past, a world founded upon faith and understanding, a world dedicated to the dignity of man and the fulfillment of his most cherished wish for freedom, tolerance, and justice."

Admiral Nimitz, remembering those who gave their lives in the Pacific War, said "They fought together as brothers in arms; they died together and now they sleep side by side. To them we have a solemn obligation - the obligation to insure that their sacrifice will help make this a better and safer world in which to live."
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Patriots & PatriotismWar, World II.
 
Location. 38° 28.676′ N, 107° 52.589′ W. Marker is in Montrose, Colorado, in Montrose County. Marker is at the intersection of Townsend Avenue (U.S. 550) and 1st Street, on the left when traveling south on Townsend Avenue. Memorial is on the county courthouse grounds. Touch for map. Marker is

Instrument of Surrender Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 12, 2020
3. Instrument of Surrender Markers
at or near this postal address: 320 South 1st Street, Montrose CO 81401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Veterans Memorial (here, next to this marker); Montrose County Jail (a few steps from this marker); The Gunnison Tunnel (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Preserving Our Heritage (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Preserving Our Heritage (about 500 feet away); What's in a Name? (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Preserving Our Heritage (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Preserving Our Heritage (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montrose.
 
Also see . . .  Japanese Instrument of Surrender. (Submitted on November 1, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 1, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 1, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 37 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 1, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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Jan. 28, 2021