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Bristol in Bucks County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Where the Canal Met the River

 
 
Where the Canal Met the River Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), November 14, 2020
1. Where the Canal Met the River Marker
Inscription.  
The Delaware Canal was built to transport coal from northeastern Pennsylvania to the Philadelphia and New York markets. Its route essentially parallels the Delaware River. So why not use the River to convey boats loaded with 70-80 tons of cargo?

The River had falls and rapids and was shallow most of the year. The Canal was a safe and reliable alternative. It was uniformly deep and used locks to overcome changes in elevation.

Its engineers decided to terminate the Delaware Canal in Bristol Borough because the Delaware River was tidal and deep enough to safely tow canal boats downriver to points in New Jersey and Philadelphia.

Handing Cargo Before Leaving
Near this site, where the Canal and River met, the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company erected a large pier, a 500 × 100-foot warehouse, and power crane in 1908. The facilities were used to unload cargo from canal boats, store it, and load it onto larger barges for river transport. The circular foundation of the power crane remains today. it is known as "The Ring" and features designs inspired by local history.

[Caption:]
The
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Delaware Canal was originally known as the Delaware Division Canal because it was one part of an extensive system of canals that ran across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

The Delaware Canal extends 58.9-miles from Bristol Borough to Easton where it connected with the Lehigh Canal. The Lehigh Canal headed north to Mauch Chunk, now known as Jim Thorpe, where coal from the mines was loaded onto canal boats.

 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Delaware Canal (AKA Delaware Division of the Pennsylvania Canal) series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1908.
 
Location. 40° 5.615′ N, 74° 51.441′ W. Marker is in Bristol, Pennsylvania, in Bucks County. Marker is on Basin Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 150 Basin Park, Bristol PA 19007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Puerto Rican Monument of Bristol (a few steps from this marker); Harriet Ross Tubman (a few steps from this marker); Tidal Delaware Water Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Working with the Tide (within shouting distance of this marker); Fueling the Economy (within shouting distance of this marker); In the Basin
Where the Canal Met the River Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), November 14, 2020
2. Where the Canal Met the River Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Marsh Ecology in an Urban Setting (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Columbus 500 Celebration (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bristol.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. This marker has replaced the linked marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 15, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 15, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 154 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 15, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Jun. 20, 2024