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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cumberland Township in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Headquarters of Major General George G. Meade

 
 
Close Up of Front Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
1. Close Up of Front Plaque
Inscription.  Headquarters of Major General George G. Meade commanding Army of the Potomac
 
Erected 1913 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 39° 48.866′ N, 77° 13.942′ W. Marker is in Cumberland Township, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker can be reached from Taneytown Road (State Highway 134), on the right when traveling south. Located on a walking trail extending between Cemetery Ridge and Meade's Headquarters, near the Leister House, in Gettysburg National Military Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Oneida New York Cavalry (a few steps from this marker); Eighth U.S. Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Companies E and I (within shouting distance of this marker); 93rd New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Lydia Leister Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); Headquarters of Brigadier General Henry Hunt
Meade Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 6, 2010
2. Meade Headquarters Marker
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(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 2d Pennsylvania Cavalry (about 400 feet away); 6th Independent Battery, New York Artillery (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cumberland Township.
 
Also see . . .  Report of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade. General Meade closed his report of the Gettysburg campaign with this accounting:
The result of the campaign may be briefly stated in the defeat of the enemy at Gettysburg, his compulsory evacuation of Pennsylvania and Maryland, and withdrawal from the upper valley of the Shenandoah, and in the capture of 3 guns, 41 standards, and 13,621 prisoners; 24,978 small-arms were collected on the battle-field.

Our own losses were very severe, amounting, as will be seen by the accompanying return, to 2,834 killed, 13,709 [13,713] wounded, and 6,643 missing; in all, 23,186 [23,190].

It is impossible in a report of this nature to enumerate all the instances or gallantry and good conduct which distinguished such a hard-fought field as Gettysburg. The reports of corps commands and their subordinates, herewith submitted, will furnish all information upon this subject. I will only add my tribute to the heroic
Disk on Cannon's Barrel image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
3. Disk on Cannon's Barrel
bravery of the whole army, officers and men, which, under the blessing of Divine Providence, enabled a crowning victory to be obtained, which I feel confident the country will never cease to bear in grateful remembrance.
(Submitted on February 10, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Headquarters of Major General George G. Meade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
4. Headquarters of Major General George G. Meade Marker
The marker incorporates a 12-pounder Heavy Field Gun.
Meade Headquarters Marker and the Leister House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 6, 2010
5. Meade Headquarters Marker and the Leister House
The Leister House, where Gen. Meade made his headquarters, can be seen to the left of the marker.
Meade Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 19, 2014
6. Meade Headquarters Marker
The staff of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade can be seen beyond the headquarters monument.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 3, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 10, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,090 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 10, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on November 13, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on February 10, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on November 13, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   6. submitted on July 19, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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