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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Oglethorpe Bench

 
 
Oglethorpe Bench Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
1. Oglethorpe Bench Marker
Inscription.  On this spot one hundred and seventy three years ago James Oglethorpe the founder of the colony pitched his tent and here rested at the close of the day from which Georgia was settled.
 
Erected 1906 by The Georgia Society of the Colonial Dames of America.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the The Colonial Dames of America, National Society of series list.
 
Location. 32° 4.884′ N, 81° 5.525′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on West Bay Street near Whitaker Street, on the left when traveling east. In small park in front of Hyatt Hotel. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Joel Chandler Harris in Savannah (within shouting distance of this marker); Landing of Oglethorpe and the Colonists (within shouting distance of this marker); This is Yamacraw Bluff (within shouting distance of
Oglethorpe Bench Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 2008
2. Oglethorpe Bench Marker
this marker); The Propeller Club of the Port of Savannah (within shouting distance of this marker); "A World Apart" (within shouting distance of this marker); Gen. Oglethorpe's Landing (within shouting distance of this marker); The Savannah (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The "John Randolph" (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Regarding Oglethorpe Bench. Owing to the colony's primary role as a military buffer between English and Spanish-held territories, the original model for the colonisation of Georgia excluded the use of slave labour, fearing that runaway slaves could internally weaken the colony and assist the enemy at St.Augustine.
 
Also see . . .  Our Georgia History. ... After putting ashore in South Carolina in January, 1733, James Oglethorpe, William Bull (an engineer from Charles Town), Peter Gordon and a group of the militia left the colonists and headed south and turned into the mouth of the Savannah River, sailing 18 miles upstream. They landed at the site of present-day Savannah. Oglethorpe was impressed with the area because Yamacraw Bluff afforded protection against an assault from the river.
Oglethorpe Bench image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Oglethorpe Bench
Around the perimeter swampy areas added to the defensive nature of the position. (Submitted on February 12, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 16, 2019. It was originally submitted on February 12, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,548 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 12, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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Jun. 6, 2020