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Reading in Berks County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

General David McMurtie Gregg

 
 
General David McMurtie Gregg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 20, 2020
1. General David McMurtie Gregg Marker
Inscription.  
Gregg commanded the Cavalry Corps at the Army of the Potomac early 1864 until the arrival of Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan, who commanded the cavalry of the forces of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in the Overland Campaign. The most important use of Gregg's cavalry during this campaign was to screen Union movements southward, battle to battle, but a significant raid was staged that culminated in the Battle of Yellow Tavern, where J.E.B. Stuart was mortally wounded, dealing the Confederacy a hard blow. Gregg's division also was heavily engaged at the Battle of Haw's Sop, where it fought Wade Hampton's troopers west of Hanovertown, Virginia. Hampton had superior numbers, but Gregg's troopers had the Spencer repeating rifle. Finally, Custer's brigade attacked through difficult terrain, ousting Hampton's men from their position.

Concluding the raid culminating in the Battle of Trevilian Station, Sheridan's cavalry retreated toward Bermuda Hundred. Gregg's division covered the retreat, especially in the Battle of Saint Mary's Church. Gregg's division survived a strong attack directed by Wade Hampton, but it lost several prisoners, including
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Colonel Pennock Huey.

Gregg commanded the cavalry division that remained near Petersburg while Sheridan was engaged in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign against Jubal Early. In his role as cavalry commander, Gregg screened various union movements in the Siege of Petersburg. Gregg's division was particularly engaged at the Second Battle of Deep Bottom, at the Second Battle of Ream's Station, and the Battle of Peebles' Farm. Near the end of his service, he was promoted to the brevet rank of major general. (Marker Number 5.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. Marker has been reported damaged. 40° 20.756′ N, 75° 55.783′ W. Marker is in Reading, Pennsylvania, in Berks County. Marker is at the intersection of North 4th Street and Oley Street, on the left when traveling north on North 4th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 650 N 4th St, Reading PA 19601, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. A different marker also named General David McMurtie Gregg (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named General David McMurtie Gregg (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named General David McMurtie Gregg (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named General David McMurtie Gregg
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(a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named General David McMurtie Gregg (a few steps from this marker); Major General David McMurtie Gregg (a few steps from this marker); Civil War Cannon (approx. 0.2 miles away); Thompson's Rifle Battalion: Capt. George Nagel's Company (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Reading.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 22, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 22, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 24 times since then. Photo   1. submitted on November 22, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
 
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Mar. 6, 2021