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Mobile in Mobile County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Site of Historic Fort Condé

 
 
The Site of Historic Fort Condé Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2014
1. The Site of Historic Fort Condé Marker
Inscription.  Patterned after forts designed by French military engineer Sebastian Le Pestre de Vauban, Fort Condé protected Mobile and its citizens for nearly 100 years from 1723-1820. Built by the French as a defense against British and Spanish attack, the strategic location of Mobile Bay guarded the eastern-most part of the Louisiana colony. Founded in 1702 at the 27-Mile Bluff site on Mobile River, the settlement was relocated in 1711 to the site on which you stand. A wooden fort was constructed and named Fort Louis after the first fort at the 27-Mile Bluff location, which itself had been named in honor of King Louis XIV of France. In 1723, construction of a new brick fort with a stone foundation began. This fort replaced the wooden one that by this time had begun to rot. Local architect Valentin Devin received the rank of engineer and was hired to oversee construction. Twenty black slaves and five white workmen labored on the initial construction of the fort. However, lack of funds and labor delayed the project’s completion until the mid 1730s. Renamed Fort Condé in honor of King Louis’s brother, the fort covered about 11 acres of land. It was built of
Marker detail: Fort Condé Plan & Elevation image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Fort Condé Plan & Elevation
local brick, stone and cedar wood. The interior structures were made of timber frames filled with a mixture of clay and Spanish moss, horsehair, or other fiber.

From 1763 to 1780, England occupied Mobile, and the fort received the name Fort Charlotte in honor of King George III’s wife. From 1780 to 1813, Spain controlled Mobile and the fort was renamed Fort Carlota. The United States seized Mobile in 1813 and again named the structure Fort Charlotte. By 1820, the fort was no longer needed for defense and Congress authorized its demolition to make way for new streets and buildings toward the river and southward.

The current Fort Condé is about 1/3 of the original fort structure recreated in 4/5-scale. It opened July 4, 1976 as part of Mobile’s United States bicentennial celebration.
 
Erected by History Museum of Mobile.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraForts and CastlesSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the The Spirit of ’76, America’s Bicentennial Celebration series list.
 
Location. 30° 41.332′ N, 88° 2.399′ W. Marker is in Mobile, Alabama, in Mobile County. Marker can be reached from South Royal Street just south of Church Street, on
The Site of Historic Fort Condé Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2014
3. The Site of Historic Fort Condé Marker
(looking down on courtyard from rampart)
the right when traveling south. Marker is located in the Fort Condé courtyard. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 150 South Royal Street, Mobile AL 36602, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. How Big was the Original Fort Condé? (a few steps from this marker); Second Fort Conde Ruin (within shouting distance of this marker); "Damn The Torpedoes!" The Campaigns for Mobile, 1864 - 1865 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Revolutionary War at Mobile (within shouting distance of this marker); Mobile's First Jail (within shouting distance of this marker); L'Arbre de Pau (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Mobile's First Theater (within shouting distance of this marker); City Hall (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mobile.
 
Also see . . .
1. Colonial Fort Condé. The original Fort Condé was built in 1723 by French explorers. Under various colonial powers, it went by different names, including Fort Louis, Fort Charlotte, and Fuerta Carlota. The extant remnants of the original fort, discovered during the construction of the Wallace Tunnel in 1966, may be seen in Mardi Gras Park, facing Church Street. The replica fort was opened in 1976, as part of the nation’s bicentennial celebration. (Submitted on November 28, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Fort Condé
The Site of Historic Fort Condé Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2014
4. The Site of Historic Fort Condé Marker
(Fort Condé reconstruction in background)
. The fort was laid out in the shape of a four-pointed star with sloped masonry walls known as bastions that measured 300 to 360 feet from tip to tip and bore sentry towers. These walls were 16 to 20 feet tall and topped by a parapet four and a half feet high. The fort's cannons were placed behind this wall. (Submitted on November 28, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Fort Condé. Fort Charlotte remained an active military post through the First Seminole War of 1817-1818, serving mostly as a logistics base during that conflict. (Submitted on November 28, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Fort Condé Courtyard image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2014
5. Fort Condé Courtyard
(marker visible on right)
Fort Condé Rampart: Cannon & Sentry Tower image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2014
6. Fort Condé Rampart: Cannon & Sentry Tower
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 28, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 24, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 61 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 28, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Feb. 26, 2021