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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Monticello in Titus County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Monticello Missionary Baptist Church

 
 
Monticello Missionary Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 7, 2020
1. Monticello Missionary Baptist Church Marker
Inscription.  

The community of Monticello dates from the 1850s and was named for Thomas Jefferson's home in Virginia. The government awarded a post office on May 5, 1857, with Cicero J. Corder as the first Postmaster. Theodore Stiewig, a later Postmaster, operated a steam mill which was the largest business in the community. The settlement remained small, and in the 1890s Monticello had stores, blacksmiths, two mills, two gins, a brick factory and a school.

The community historically supported Monticello Baptist and Spring Hill churches. Minutes of the area Rehoboth Baptist Association first reference Monticello Baptist Church in 1878. That year, E. Blanton was pastor and J.W. Barrow and E.Y. Bynum were messengers to the association meeting. The church first met on Bynum's land and in 1919 the congregation moved here on one acre sold by W.P. and Stella Jones. A new church building was erected soon after. The wood frame sanctuary is a cross gabled t-plan building with paired double-hung wood windows and shiplap wood siding. Congregation members donated pine trees, hauled by mule-drawn wagons to Will Taylor's planing mill to saw into lumber.
Monticello Missionary Baptist Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 7, 2020
2. Monticello Missionary Baptist Church and Marker
About 19 members worked on the church and construction took three months to finish, being completed in November 1919.

The church has been a spiritual and social center for the community since its founding. During the 1950s, church members sewed quilts donated to the Texarkana Baptist Orphanage and the Lena Pope Home for orphans in Fort Worth. By the early 21st Century, area land was being used for recreational lakes and lignite mining, and the church was one of the few historic resources remaining in Monticello. The congregation remains active although Church services are held infrequently.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2007
Marker is property of the State of Texas

 
Erected 2007 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13957.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Churches & Religion.
 
Location. 33° 5.541′ N, 95° 5.276′ W. Marker is near Monticello, Texas, in Titus County. Marker is at the intersection of Farm to Market Road 127 and County Highway 2715, on the left when traveling south on Highway 127. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mount Pleasant TX 75455, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Rockhill Cemetery (approx. 3.7 miles away); Cherokee Trace
Monticello Missionary Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 7, 2020
3. Monticello Missionary Baptist Church
(approx. 4.3 miles away); Ripley Massacre (approx. 7 miles away); Leesburg Cemetery (approx. 7.2 miles away); Henry Clay Thruston (approx. 8 miles away); Titus County C.S.A. (approx. 8.2 miles away); Titus County Confederate Monument (approx. 8.2 miles away); First Presbyterian Church of Mt. Pleasant (approx. 8.3 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Monticello, Texas. TSHA Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on November 26, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 26, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 29 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 26, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021