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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Rice Lake in Barron County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Logging and Lumbering in the Rice Lake Area

A Chronology

 
 
Logging and Lumbering in the Rice Lake Area Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2018
1. Logging and Lumbering in the Rice Lake Area Marker
Inscription.  
1831
Henry Schoolcraft, Indian agent from Sault St. Marie, MI travels down the Red Cedar River to Rice Lake and held council with the Chippewa Indians at this approximate site.

1847
The Knapp Stout Co. purchased thousands of acres of Northern Wisconsin virgin pine. This purchase ushered in the logging era.

1863
John H. Knapp, Henry L Stout, Andrew Tainter, and William Wilson purchase the property where you are now standing. This became the lumbering hub of northern Wisconsin.

1864
The first dam was built at the present location in Rice Lake.

1868
The Knapp Stout General Store was relocated from Louseburg to approximate site of the Rice Lake Regional Airport.

1871
Knapp Stout Company builds a small saw mill (with one single up and down saw) north of the present dam. The output for this mill was used locally.

1880
The Knapp Stout Company was known as the largest lumber corporation in the world.

1882
The rail lines reach Rice Lake bringing more people and allowing more logs to be shipped in and lumber to be
Marker detail: Steam Log Hauler image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Bruce Ward & Chronotype Publishing
2. Marker detail: Steam Log Hauler
shipped out. This was the biggest boom time for the area to this point.

1887
The Rice Lake Lumber Company began operation in Rice Lake. The Mill was large, utilizing the most modern technology of that time. It was owned by Orrin Ingram of Eau Claire and was constructed ¼ mile southeast of the present dam. It continued to coexist with Knapp Stout until 1901. The building on the Northeast corner of Main & Allen Street was constructed as the headquarters. It still serves local businesses.
 
Erected by National Lumbering Hall of Fame.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Horticulture & ForestryIndustry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 45° 29.896′ N, 91° 43.885′ W. Marker is in Rice Lake, Wisconsin, in Barron County. Marker can be reached from Stein Street east of South Main Street (County Road SS), on the right when traveling east. Leftmost of two markers in kiosk on east side of the Lumbering Hall of Fame & Boat Landing parking lot. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Stein Street, Rice Lake WI 54868, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Rice Lake, a City Built of Lumber (here, next to this marker); The Mystery of the Concrete Pillars
Marker detail: Loaded Log Sled image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Bruce Ward & Chronotype Publishing
3. Marker detail: Loaded Log Sled
(within shouting distance of this marker); Lentz Steam Engine (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church (approx. 4½ miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Rice Lake, Wisconsin Lumbering History
 
Also see . . .
1. Knapp, Stout & Company. On June 1, 1846 John H. Knapp, Sr., William Wilson, a Mr. Green and David Black took over the operation of a sawmill on Wilson Creek in Wisconsin. The mill, renamed Knapp & Black, had been constructed in 1831 and was considered the oldest mill in the state. The firm experienced a rapid expansion between 1866 and 1869 with three mills opened in Wisconsin. (Submitted on December 4, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Knapp, Stout & Company. By 1870, the company had control of the Red Cedar River valley. Crews moved through the wilderness, cutting the virgin timber and preparing it for its river voyage. Pioneers followed, removing stumps and preparing the rich land for farming. Communities sprang up around the company's dams and mill sites. From 1871 to 1896 the company, sent an average 85 million board feet of lumber down the Red Cedar, Chippewa and Mississippi Rivers to St. Louis. (Submitted on December 4, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Marker detail: Knapp, Stout & Co. – Late 1800’s Near Rice Lake image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Bruce Ward & Chronotype Publishing
4. Marker detail: Knapp, Stout & Co. – Late 1800’s Near Rice Lake
Supt. James Bracklin in center (fur coat). He joined Knapp, Stout Co. in 1876 and was the mayor of Rice Lake for 3 separate 1-year terms – 1889,1891 & 1893.
 

3. Forestry museum, lumbering hall of fame efforts increasing. Evidence of northern Wisconsin’s proud lumbering heritage can be found throughout the region. Look no further than the street signs in the city of Rice Lake, many which bear the familiar surnames of prominent lumber barons such as Knapp, Stout, Tainter and Wilson. (Submitted on December 4, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Marker detail: Oxen-pulled Log Sled image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Bruce Ward & Chronotype Publishing
5. Marker detail: Oxen-pulled Log Sled
National Lumbering Hall of Fame Interpretive Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2018
6. National Lumbering Hall of Fame Interpretive Kiosk
(marker on left side)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 2, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 56 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 4, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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