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Chalmette in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Chalmette Battlefield And National Cemetery

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park

 
 
Chalmette Battlefield And National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, December 24, 2018
1. Chalmette Battlefield And National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
Chalmette Battlefield and the Battle of New Orleans

Major General Andrew Jackson's troops were outnumbered and less experienced yet they defended and secured the port of New Orleans from British invasion on January 8, 1815. This surprising victory at Chalmet plantation was the last major battle in the War of 1812. The American victory preserved U.S. claims to the Louisiana Purchase territory, prompted settlement in the Mississippi River valley, made Jackson a national hero, and encouraged American pride and unity.

Chalmette National Cemetery

President Abraham Lincoln approved legislation on July 17, 1862, that established national cemeteries for American forces. Two years later near the end of the Civil War, Chalmette National Cemetery was established to receive Union troops who died in Louisiana. In later years the cemetery served as a final resting place for veterans of all major U.S. wars from the War of 1812 to Vietnam. Four Americans who fought in the War of 1812 are buried here; one of them took part in the Battle of New Orleans. The estimated number of burials is nearly 16,000.

Points

Chalmette Battlefield And National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, December 24, 2018
2. Chalmette Battlefield And National Cemetery Marker
of Interest

Visitor center, open during normal park hours
Films, exhibits, and interactive displays tell the story of the Battle of New Orleans. A large map outlines troop movements during the New Orleans campaign and the January 8, 1815, battle.

Cannons and rampart
A re-creation of the rampart which protected the American troops from the British army runs along the remnants of Rodriguez Canal. The period and reproduction cannons in the batteries represent Jackson's artillery line.

Malus-Beauregard House, open during normal park hours
This beautiful example of period Louisiana architecture was built 18 years after the Battle of New Orleans, It is named for its first and last private owners, Madeleine Pannetier Malus and Judge René Beauregard.

Self-guided tours
Exhibits along the walkways describe the Battle of New Orleans and the site's later history.

Chalmette Monument, open during normal park hours
By the battle's 25th anniversary in 1840, local citizens were organizing to raise a monument honoring Andrew Jackson and his troops. Construction began in 1855, but the monument was not completed until 1908 due to decades of funding problems. Each year on January 8, a wreath-laying ceremony at the monument honors the men who fought and died at the Battle of New Orleans.

Mississippi

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River levee
A low levee was already in place along this stretch of river during the Battle of New Orleans. The Mississippi River was and still is a vital transportation and shipping corridor and New Orleans-area ports continue to ship goods from America's interior to the rest of the world.

Battle of New Orleans anniversary
Each year in early January, living history experts dressed as period troops and civilians bring the battle to life with cannon and musket firings, cooking and craft demonstrations, and discussions of War of 1812 tactics and strategy.
 
Erected by National Park Service, Department of the Interior.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War of 1812.
 
Location. 29° 56.791′ N, 89° 59.501′ W. Marker is in Chalmette, Louisiana, in St. Bernard Parish. Marker can be reached from Battlefield Road west of West St Bernard Highway (State Route 46), on the right when traveling west. Located at East Entrance to Chalmette Battlefield. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Battlefield Road, Chalmette LA 70043, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Kentucky Rifle (within shouting distance of this marker); Chalmette Battlefield (within shouting distance of this marker); Batteries Seven and Eight

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(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Batteries 5 and 6 (about 600 feet away); Batteries Five and Six (about 700 feet away); Battle Of New Orleans 200th Anniversary (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Main Attack (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pakenham's Fall (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chalmette.
 
Additional comments.
1. Entrance marker.
This is a duplicate marker of one on the west side of the battlefield park.
    — Submitted December 4, 2020.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 4, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 48 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 4, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A wide shot of the marker and its surroundings. • Can you help?
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Mar. 1, 2021