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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Frankfort in Franklin County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

History of Memorial Project

 
 
History of Memorial Project Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 28, 2020
1. History of Memorial Project Marker
Inscription.  The first discussions of creating a memorial began in April of 2004 as the Kentucky Guard community struggled with the losses of Technical Sergeants Martin A. Tracy & Christopher Matero while training. That was followed by the deaths of Sergeant Darrin K. Potter in Iraq; Sergeant Glenn Scott Stanfill while training and First Lieutenant Robert L. Henderson II in Iraq.

This was tempered with the growing body of research in preparation for the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 that many Kentuckians who fought in the War of 1812 were still buried in unmarked mass graves along many trails to and from Canada.

Further evidence of the fleeting memory of the fallen continued to crop up with the discovery of other forgotten historical losses such as Sergeant Thomas J. Brown who died on state active duty in the Kentucky Guard response to the great flood of 1937.

A few dedicated individuals took it upon themselves to not only rescue the fallen from the clutches of a forgetful history but also to ensure that the fallen from the Global War on Terror and any future losses would not be forgotten as have so many in the decades past.

The
History of Memorial Project Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 28, 2020
2. History of Memorial Project Marker
next phase began in October 2008, when a group of friends and former members of the Kentucky Army and Air National Guard created a nonprofit corporation, the Kentucky National Guard Memorial Fund, Inc., to further the effort. The Memorial Fund was granted tax exempt status as a public charity 501 C (3) by the Internal Revenue Service in February 2009.

The Memorial Fund had a simple mission then as now — Honor all those who have served as Kentucky citizen-soldiers and especially those who perished in the line of duty.

As the effort matured and seriously tackled efforts to identify the Kentucky Guard men and women who died in line of duty, it soon became apparent that the research to document all those who perished from pre-statehood as members of the militia to present to include the Civil War would be impossible for volunteers in one lifetime. It quickly became apparent that the further back in history one looked, the scarcer documentation of the fallen was and the more difficult it became to know with any degree of certainty the names of those who should be honored.

The board anguished over how to tackle the challenge, but finally struck a more achievable objective by focusing on the modern Kentucky National Guard. On March 19, 1912, Kentucky adopted federal legislation which mandated significant change including a name change from Kentucky State
Kentucky National Guard Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 28, 2020
3. Kentucky National Guard Memorial
As seen from West Frankfort Connector.
Guard to the Kentucky National Guard. Thus the board's effort was focused on designing, constructing and maintaining a memorial to honor our forgotten heroes and to educate our soldiers, airmen and the public of the history of the Kentucky National Guard.

The effort to locate our fallen heroes was a major undertaking working with various individuals and organizations across the state. We were able to find many whose name and service had been all but forgotten. The effort to locate additional names will continue into the future.

From the time Daniel Boone first came through the Cumberland Gap the predecessors of today's Kentucky National Guard have served to protect the lives and property of the citizens of what became Kentucky. Men and women from every county of Kentucky have served in the Kentucky National Guard and serve today.

In order to honor that service and the sacrifice of those who have fallen in the line of duty — all 120 counties provided soil the Kentucky National Guard Memorial rests upon. Soil from across Kentucky supports this Memorial and provides a lasting link to their homes, families and communities as these men and women have supported and continue to support citizens across this Commonwealth.

 
Erected by Kentucky National Guard.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed
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in this topic list: Military.
 
Location. 38° 11.298′ N, 84° 53.669′ W. Marker is in Frankfort, Kentucky, in Franklin County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Minuteman Parkway and West Frankfort Connector. Marker is at Kentucky National Guard Memorial at entrance to Boone National Guard Center. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 101 Minuteman Parkway, Frankfort KY 40601, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Daniel Boone (here, next to this marker); "Fight as Kentuckians" (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named "Fight as Kentuckians" (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named "Fight as Kentuckians" (a few steps from this marker); Kentucky National Guard Memorial (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named "Fight as Kentuckians" (within shouting distance of this marker); Lewis and Clark in Kentucky — Kentucky Militia (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Kentucky's Capitol and Capital (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frankfort.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 7, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 5, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 31 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 5, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.   2, 3. submitted on December 6, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.
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Mar. 8, 2021