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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Frankfort in Franklin County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Daniel Boone

A Legend in His Own Time ...

 
 
Daniel Boone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 28, 2020
1. Daniel Boone Marker
Inscription.  A legend in his own lifetime, Daniel Boone was an explorer and hunter whose exploits made him one of the most famous frontiersmen in American history. One of 11 children raised in a Quaker household, he was born on November 2, 1734, in Berks County Pennsylvania. Little is known of his formative years, other than he aspired to be a woodsman rather than a farmer.

Family "scandals” resulted in his father's expulsion from the Society of Friends and the family moved to the Yadkin Valley of North Carolina, arriving in 1751 or 1752. From there Boone explored west into Kentucky in the 1760s and 1770s. In 1775 he established the frontier outpost of Boonesborough, one of the first white settlements in Kentucky. When the Kentucky territory became part of Virginia, Boone was named an officer in the Virginia militia and spent the next several years trail blazing and fighting Indians. His “autobiography,” written by John Filson and published in 1784, depicted Boone as wily and adventurous and made him a folk hero.

Boone tried to establish extensive land claims in Kentucky, but was unable to retain them and many were invalidated
Daniel Boone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 28, 2020
2. Daniel Boone Marker
Marker is in the center.
after 1780. After living in western Virginia, where he served three times in the state legislature, Boone moved in 1799 to what is now Missouri. He settled there with his son, Daniel Morgan Boone, and was later granted land by the U.S. Congress. He died near St. Louis in 1820 at the age of 85 and is now buried in the Frankfort Cemetery.

Commencing in the 1820s, several actors have portrayed Boone in various buckskin costumes, all of which included a coonskin cap. The most popular of these portrayals was by the actor Fess Parker in the TV series Daniel Boone from 1964-70. The real Boone thought coonskin caps were silly and impractical. Boone always wore a beaver or felt hat instead, which had a wide brim for keeping out the sun and rain.

Daniel Boone was chosen as the center piece of the memorial because he is uniquely linked to the establishment of Kentucky and his presence pays tribute to the roots of today's Kentucky National Guard. New Kentucky National Guard officer candidate school graduates are sworn in at Daniel Boone's grave site in homage to his place in Kentucky Military History. Boone National Guard Center, the state's National Guard headquarters was named in his honor in 1962.

(Sidebar)
The Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels provided funding for the Daniel Boone Bronze through its Good Works Program. Every year, The Honorable
Daniel Boone statue at Kentucky National Guard Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 28, 2020
3. Daniel Boone statue at Kentucky National Guard Memorial
Order of Kentucky Colonels, utilizing contributions from individual Colonels from all over the world, provides financial support to Kentucky charitable and educational institutions and organizations. Kentucky Colonels are unwavering in devotion to faith, family, fellowman and country. Passionate about being compassionate. Proud, yet humble. Leaders who are not ashamed to follow. Gentle but strong in will and commitment. The Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels, as a Brotherhood, reaches out to care for our children, support those in need and preserve our rich heritage.

Captions
Top right: Above, Daniel Boone sat to have his portrait painted only once in his lifetime for Chester Harding in 1820.
Bottom right: At right, renowned Kentucky sculptor Wyatt L. Gragg of Prospect refines the larger than life clay of Boone.
 
Erected by Kentucky National Guard.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraExplorationFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 38° 11.298′ N, 84° 53.669′ W. Marker is in Frankfort, Kentucky, in Franklin County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Minuteman Parkway and West Frankfort Connector
Daniel Boone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
4. Daniel Boone
Daniel Boone sat to have his portrait painted only once in his lifetime for Chester Harding in 1820.
The 1820-1860 portrait by Chester Harding hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.
. Marker is at Kentucky National Guard Memorial at entrance to Boone National Guard Center. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 101 Minuteman Parkway, Frankfort KY 40601, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. History of Memorial Project (here, next to this marker); "Fight as Kentuckians" (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named "Fight as Kentuckians" (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named "Fight as Kentuckians" (a few steps from this marker); Kentucky National Guard Memorial (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named "Fight as Kentuckians" (within shouting distance of this marker); Lewis and Clark in Kentucky — Kentucky Militia (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Kentucky's Capitol and Capital (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frankfort.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 14, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 5, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 46 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 5, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.   2, 3. submitted on December 6, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.   4. submitted on December 14, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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Feb. 25, 2021