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Scott Air Force Base in St. Clair County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

C-9A Nightingale

71-0877

 
 
C-9A Nightingale Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Jason Voigt, December 10, 2020
1. C-9A Nightingale Marker
Inscription.  A modified McDonnell Douglas DC-9, the C-9A was the only aircraft in the US Air Force inventory at the time specifically dedicated to the movement of litter and ambulatory patients. The name "nightingale" was selected by the chief nurse of the 375th Aeromedical Airlift Wing, Lieutenant Colonel Mary Ann Tonne, in honor of Florence Nightingale, the British nurse who pioneered military nursing during the Crimean War. At the initial rollout ceremony on June 17, 1968, in Long Beach, California, the first C-9A (67-22584) was christened with water from the Sea of Galilee by Mrs. Elsie Ott Madot, who in 1943, had been the first Army Air Force nurse to fly on an intercontinental aeromedical evacuation mission. The Nightingale was specially fitted with an assortment of medical equipment: a hydraulically operated folding ramp, patient monitoring devices, plus special oxygen, vacuum, and electrical systems. The C-9A nearly doubled the speed and range of the propeller driven C-131A Samaritan aircraft it replaced. Scott AFB became the hub for C-9A operations, maintenance, and training. The 375th Aeromedical Airlift Wing held continental U.S. aeromedical
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responsibilities from 1966, and gained worldwide aeromedical responsibilities in 1975 - a mission it continued to support until Air Force-wide reorganizations in 1990. The 375th Airlift Wing continued flying medical missions, with its C-9's until August 11, 2003, the day Scott's last C-9A Nightingale aeromedical flight departed. The C-9A aircraft on display spent most of its flying career in the Pacific Theater, though it did fly for the 375th from 1980-1993. Today, this display honors all those who flew and supported the C-9A Nightingale, the "Cadillac of Airevac" during its 35 year history.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of the United States Air Force.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Air & SpaceMilitaryParks & Recreational Areas. A significant historical date for this entry is June 17, 1968.
 
Location. 38° 32.935′ N, 89° 51.989′ W. Marker is in Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, in St. Clair County. Marker can be reached from Seibert Road, 0.7 miles east of Air Mobility Drive (Illinois Route 158). Marker is located at Scott Field Heritage Air Park, near the west entrance of Scott Air Force Base. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 763 Seibert Rd, Scott Air Force Base IL 62225, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. C-130E Hercules (within shouting distance of this marker); C-21A (within
C-9A Nightingale Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Jason Voigt, December 10, 2020
2. C-9A Nightingale Marker
shouting distance of this marker); C-140A Jetstar (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); KC-135E Stratotanker (about 400 feet away); C-141B Starlifter (about 500 feet away); Harold E. Goettler (approx. half a mile away); Colonel Lawrence "Rocky" Lane (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Airlift / Tanker Association (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Scott Air Force Base.
 
Also see . . .  McDonnell Douglas C-9 on Wikipedia. (Submitted on December 12, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.)
 
C-9A Nightingale image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Jason Voigt, December 10, 2020
3. C-9A Nightingale
The plane and marker, located at Scott Field Heritage Air Park.
Supplementary plaque image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Jason Voigt, December 10, 2020
4. Supplementary plaque
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 12, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 12, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. This page has been viewed 292 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 12, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.

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Apr. 24, 2024