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Frankfort in Franklin County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Kentucky's Civil War Governors

Kentucky Lincoln Heritage Trail

 

— Fort Hill Civil War Park —

 
Kentucky's Civil War Govners Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, July 3, 2019
1. Kentucky's Civil War Govners Marker
Inscription.  During the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln frequently tangled with the governors of Kentucky. Disagreements usually erupted over Union military policies involving civilian arrests, the emancipation of slaves, and the enlistment of African American soldiers.

Kentucky's first wartime governor, Beriah Magoffin, fought Lincoln over secession and Kentucky's neutrality policy. When the Confederacy was formed, Lincoln requested Kentucky soldiers to fight the rebellion; but the governor refused. Once the Kentucky legislature became overwhelmingly pro-Union, Magoffin became an ineffectual executive and resigned from office.

Magoffin's successor, Governor James Robinson, also frequently disagreed with the Lincoln administration. Although Robinson supported the Union, he complained about Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and civilian arrests made by Union military authorities. In the 1864 presidential election, Robinson supported Lincoln's opponent, General George McClellan.

Kentucky's final Civil War-era governor was Thomas E. Bramlette. He complained to Lincoln about Union military interference in local elections and differed

Kentucky's Civil War Govners Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, July 3, 2019
2. Kentucky's Civil War Govners Marker
with Lincoln over many issues, including African American enlistments and the suspension of the writ of habeus corpus. After Lincoln's assassination at the end of the Civil War, however, Bramlette recognized that Lincoln had worked "to preserve all that is worth preserving and that could possibly be preserved from the wreck of this revolution...experience and time has demonstrated that his was the only line of salvation for our country."

Lincoln maintained a rocky relationship with Kentucky's governors during the Civil War Although the governors differed with Lincoln over policy issues, throughout the conflict the commonwealth officially remained loyal to the Unionist cause.
 
Erected by Kentucky Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 38° 12.267′ N, 84° 52.217′ W. Marker is in Frankfort, Kentucky, in Franklin County. Marker is on Clifton Avenue half a mile west of Cheek Street, on the right when traveling east. The marker is near the museum on the Fort Hill Civil War Park grounds. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Clifton Ave, Frankfort KY 40601, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Election Of 1860 And 1864 — Kentucky (here, next to this marker); Kentucky: Union Or Confederate?

Kentucky's Civil War Govners Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, July 3, 2019
3. Kentucky's Civil War Govners Marker
(here, next to this marker); "Kentucky Scouts" Frankfort Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); General John Hunt Morgan's Cavalrymen (within shouting distance of this marker); Load! Ready! Fire! (within shouting distance of this marker); Remembering The Soldiers Of The War Of 1812 On Both Sides (approx. ¼ mile away); Beneath The Soil In Front Of You (approx. ¼ mile away); Here Lie The Remains of 250 Citizens Of Frankfort (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frankfort.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Hill. The Capital City Museum & Leslie Morris Park on Fort Hill. (Submitted on December 14, 2020.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 14, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 13, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 32 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 13, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 5, 2021