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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Washburn in McLean County, North Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Bicentennial Wagon Train Pilgrimage to Pennsylvania

 
 
Bicentennial Wagon Train Pilgrimage to Pennsylvania Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 28, 2020
1. Bicentennial Wagon Train Pilgrimage to Pennsylvania Marker
Inscription.  From this site, North Dakota Wagon Train, that took our message to Valley Forge, left on September 26, 1975.
Outriders presented scrolls from their various bicentennial communities to Wagon Master Jerry Nelson and Governor Arthur Link. These scrolls dedicated their communities to the support of the bicentennial observance in our nation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Events.
 
Location. 47° 17.904′ N, 101° 5.214′ W. Marker is near Washburn, North Dakota, in McLean County. Marker can be reached from 8th Street Southwest (County Highway 17) near 28th Avenue Southwest, on the right when traveling west. The marker is located in Fort Mandan State Recreation Area near the entrance to the replica Fort Mandan. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washburn ND 58577, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Below the Freezing Point (a few steps from this marker); Fort Mandan (a few steps from this marker); Men of Worth (within shouting distance of this marker); Seaman (about 500 feet away, measured
Bicentennial Wagon Train Pilgrimage to Pennsylvania Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 28, 2020
2. Bicentennial Wagon Train Pilgrimage to Pennsylvania Marker
in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Mandan (about 500 feet away); Mandan Winter / Harmony Park (approx. 2.1 miles away); Fort Mandan Overlook (approx. 9.3 miles away); Mandans and Arikaras of the Village (approx. 9.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Washburn.
 
Also see . . .
1. Bicentennial Wagon Train -- King of Prussia Historical Society. The Bicentennial Commission of Pennsylvania, which organized the event, described it as “a replay of history – in reverse. A train of covered wagons – one from each state – is crossing the country from West to East, adhering as closely as possible to original pioneer trails and wagon routes.” They provided an authentic Conestoga wagon or Prairie Schooner for each state... (Submitted on December 15, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 

2. Americas Best History. The odd part of the Wagon Train was in the signing of scrolls by participants and visitors, including President Ford. Over twenty-two million people signed them, preservation of a time and bicentennnial event for perpetuity. But someone society lost them since.
Bicentennial Wagon Train image. Click for full size.
By Unknown
3. Bicentennial Wagon Train
Today, none of the scrolls can be found in the various archives where you'd think they might be; not at Valley Forge, the state archives in Harrisburg, or Washington, D.C. They were supposed to be buried in a time capsule. Nobody can find that either.
(Submitted on December 15, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 

3. Fort Mandan Winter -- Discovering Lewis & Clark. "This place we have named Fort Mandan," Lewis recorded, "in honour of our Neighbours"—their kind and congenial Mandan Indians....Here they wintered-over near the Mandans, "the most friendly, well disposed Indians inhabiting the Missouri . . . brave, humane and hospitable." They talked peace and commerce, American style, to all who would listen. (Submitted on December 15, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 15, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 15, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 39 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 15, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Feb. 26, 2021