Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Civil War, Emancipation and Juneteenth

1861-1865

 
 
Civil War, Emancipation and Juneteenth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry D. Moore, December 16, 2020
1. Civil War, Emancipation and Juneteenth Marker
Inscription.  

On the eve of the Civil War, the number of enslaved people in Texas totaled 30 percent of the state's population. This number continued to grow as slaveholders from other areas of the Confederacy came to Texas as refugees to escape the fighting and brought their enslaved property with them. Scholars estimate that more than, 30,000 enslaved people were brought into Texas during the Civil War years alone. The conflict did not readily change the Black experience in Texas, as most African-Americans continued to be held in bondage and forced to labor.

Federal troops occupied Texas in June 1865 after the Civil War. General Gordon Granger issued General Order Number 3 at Galveston on June 19, 1865 to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation previously signed by President Abraham Lincoln. That day soon became recognized as Juneteenth or Emancipation Day, although many slaves in Texas were not freed until much later. Juneteenth was officially declared a state holiday in Texas in 1980, and today it continues to be celebrated here and in other states as a milestone of the African-American struggle for freedom.

After Emancipation,
Texas African American History Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Larry D. Moore, December 16, 2020
2. Texas African American History Memorial
the former slaves entered the new stage of freedom with a mixture of joy, despair, elation, fear, hope, doubt, certainty and confusion. With little social infrastructure other than their families, they sought to make their way in a nation and state they helped to create, but in which they had very little ownership, input or power.
 
Erected 2016 by Texas African American History Memorial Foundation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: African Americans.
 
Location. 30° 16.398′ N, 97° 44.489′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is at the intersection of West 11th Street and Congress Avenue, on the right when traveling west on West 11th Street. The marker is on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Austin TX 78701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Reconstruction and the Post Slavery Experience (here, next to this marker); Slavery During the Republic and Early Statehood (here, next to this marker); Post Reconstruction Challenges and Achievements (here, next to this marker); Slavery During the Mexican National Era (here, next to this marker); Major Achievements (here, next to this marker); Hendrick Arnold and Samuel McCulloch, Jr.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
(here, next to this marker); The 21st Century (here, next to this marker); First Contact and the Spanish Colonial Era (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
More about this marker. The marker is one of ten markers on the Texas African American History Memorial. The monument honors the many contributions of African Americans in Texas. The markers trace the history of African Americans from the 1500s to the present.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 3, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 20, 2020, by Larry D. Moore of Del Valle, Texas. This page has been viewed 37 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 20, 2020, by Larry D. Moore of Del Valle, Texas.
Paid Advertisement
Feb. 24, 2021