Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Battles for Texas Independence from Mexico

1836

 
 
Battles for Texas Independence from Mexico Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry D. Moore, December 16, 2020
1. Battles for Texas Independence from Mexico Marker
Inscription.  Several notable individuals of African descent participated in the battles at the Alamo and San Jacinto in 1836. Joe, slave of William B. Travis, fought at the Alamo and survived. His account of the fighting is one of the most important Alamo narratives. Mack Smith, slave of Ben Fort Smith, and Dick the Drummer, a musician, both participated in the battle of San Jacinto.

A story recorded in 1842 by William Bollaert, an Englishman touring Texas, claimed that the Mexican Army probably lost the battle of San Jacinto because of the influence of a mulatto girl named "Emily,” who belonged to Col. James Morgan and was "closeted” in Santa Anna's tent, detaining him when the Texans charged the Mexican Army camp. No other account of the battle mentions this story, but in l836 a free woman named Emily D. West, who came to Texas from New York in late 1835, was employed by Col. Morgan as a house worker in New Washington (now Morgan's Point) on Galveston Bay. Morgan's settlement was occupied and burned by Santa Anna's army on April 20, the day before the battle. His servants, unable to escape, were captured by the Mexican Army. Emily,
Texas African American History Memorial (back) image. Click for full size.
By Larry D. Moore, December 16, 2020
2. Texas African American History Memorial (back)
sometimes known as "the Yellow Rose of Texas,” may have been among the prisoners because in 1837, when seeking a passport to leave Texas, she said she had lost her free papers at San Jacinto in April 1836.
 
Erected 2016 by the Texas African American History Memorial Foundation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: African Americans.
 
Location. 30° 16.4′ N, 97° 44.488′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is at the intersection of West 11th Street and Congress Avenue, on the right when traveling west on West 11th Street. Marker is on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Austin TX 78701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hendrick Arnold and Samuel McCulloch, Jr. (here, next to this marker); The 21st Century (here, next to this marker); Major Achievements (here, next to this marker); Post Reconstruction Challenges and Achievements (here, next to this marker); Civil War, Emancipation and Juneteenth (here, next to this marker); Reconstruction and the Post Slavery Experience (here, next to this marker); Slavery During the Mexican National Era (here, next to this marker); Slavery During the Republic and Early Statehood (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
More about this marker. The marker is one of ten markers on the Texas African American History Memorial. The monument honors the many contributions of African Americans in Texas. The markers trace the history of African Americans from the 1500s to the present.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 20, 2020, by Larry D. Moore of Del Valle, Texas. This page has been viewed 38 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 20, 2020, by Larry D. Moore of Del Valle, Texas.
Paid Advertisement
Jan. 19, 2021